Evict Radon
By: University of Calgary, Cumming School of Medicine
Grant Number: 2018-27

Canada contains many radon gas-generating regions and, because we have constructed population centres across all of them, radon is the primary cause of lung cancer in 10,000- 40,000 Canadians per decade. We have conducted detailed radon gas analysis of 11,000+ homes spread across Alberta and Saskatchewan, finding that 1 in 6 contain hazardous amounts of radon with newer homes in many regions (but not all) having much higher total radon. We have revealed an unknown “X factor” within environmental design practice across regions that is a major contributor to radon exposure, and our goal now is to understand this and develop solutions to protect the population. We aim to (i) identify modifiable behaviors and environmental design practices influencing chronic radon exposure in our changing world and (ii) define engineering and community intervention solutions applicable within the Canadian context to eliminate radon as a source of cancer in the future.

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Sustainable Action Canmore Booklet
By: Biosphere Institute of the Bow Valley
Grant Number: 2017-24

The Biosphere Institute, in collaboration with the Alberta Real Estate Foundation, local REALTORS® and the Town of Canmore, created this booklet to help new residents of the Bow Valley take part in meeting the goals of Town of Canmore’s Climate Action Plan. Learn more about the Climate Action Plan goals here.

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WellWiki Alberta
By: University of Alberta – Alberta School of Business
Grant Number: 2017-15

WellWiki.org is a groundbreaking solution to the problem of information access and transparency related to data on oil and gas development. While in many cases some data on wells is publicly available, interested parties face an arcane and obscure process for accessing it which deters many from pursing the information they need. WellWiki.org solves this problem, providing access to information in an easy to use format available to all and has been successful across North America.

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Should Alberta Adopt a Land Transfer Tax?
By: University of Calgary, The School of Public Polic
Grant Number: 2017-13

Alberta does not have a land transfer tax on the sale of real property, nor should the province contemplate bringing one in. Instead, if the Alberta government seeks new tax revenue, it should institute a sales tax or raise property taxes.

This paper examines previous research on land transfer taxes in Canada, Australia and Europe, and concludes that such a tax would only add its own volatility to that inherent to Alberta’s resource revenue-based economy. Calculations show that a one-per-cent land transfer tax in Alberta would have yielded between $460 million and $500 million for provincial coffers in 2017. However appealing that amount of revenue sounds, the tax’s benefits do not outweigh its drawbacks.

 

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A PACE Program in Alberta: An Analysis of the Issues
By: University of Calgary, The School of Public Policy
Grant Number: 2017-13

Poised to implement its own Property Assessed Clean Energy program (PACE), Alberta is in an ideal position to develop regulations that address the program’s main issues by learning from other jurisdictions’ experiences with PACE.

The goal of PACE is to help Albertans live greener by providing financing for clean energy upgrades to their properties. The funding would take the form of a loan repaid through an annual amount added to their property taxes.

A 2018 survey reported that 68 per cent of Albertans believe the provincial economy would benefit by transitioning to lower carbon energy sources. Nova Scotia’s experience has borne out PACE’s intrinsic value – homes with PACE-financed upgrades in that province reduced their total energy consumption by 33 per cent, thus saving approximately 10 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions per year for each home.

This paper examines the experiences with PACE in both the U.S. and Canada and offers a framework for creating an Alberta model. Still at square one with newly enacted legislation, the Alberta government must address through regulation such issues as the size of PACE loans, eligibility requirements for property owners, what types of environmental upgrades will be permitted and even the interest rate on loans funding the program.

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Residential Rebates for Alberta’s Homeowners
By: Alberta Real Estate Association
Grant Number: 2017-07

Homeowners in Alberta are becoming more conscious of the value of energy efficiency, and because of this, buyers and sellers alike are adding home efficiency upgrades and deficiencies to their “must have” or “to do” list. With funding from the Alberta Real Estate Foundation, AREA, in partnership with the Pembina Institute, wants to empower Alberta’s REALTORS® by providing them with information that can enrich client relationships during Alberta’s energy transition. REALTORS® have a unique opportunity to add value to their services by educating their clients on the current energy efficiency features of a property and assisting them in identifying energy efficiency opportunities. This series of tools and resources is designed to help REALTORS® educate themselves on, and market themselves to clients who are actively interested in residential energy efficiency, as well as assist in marketing properties to energy-conscious buyers.

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Canadian Rental Housing Index
By: BC Non-Profit Housing Association
Grant Number: 2017-21

The Index is a comprehensive database that compiles rental housing statistics for cities, regions, and provinces across Canada. See how much rent Canadians are paying in different parts of the country, compare affordability measures and find out where residents are overcrowded and severely overspending on housing.

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Attic Insulation
By: Alberta Real Estate Association
Grant Number: 2017-07

The Alberta Real Estate Association (AREA) has partnered with the Pembina Institute to educate REALTORS® and their clients on the value of energy efficiency. As a collaboration, the project will leverage AREA’s expertise on the needs of REALTORS® and homeowners and the Pembina Institute’s expertise on clean energy, climate change and energy issues to transform how Alberta’s REALTORS® understand and serve homeowners on this topic of increasing importance.

This fact sheet on attic insulation is the first part of a series of energy efficiency educational tools for Alberta’s REALTORS® and their clients. Look for more resources in the near future here.

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Conservation Easements for Landowners
By: Legacy Land Trust Society
Grant Number: 2017-04

A conservation easement is a voluntary agreement between a landowner and a qualified organization (such as the Legacy Land Trust Society) which limits the amount and type of development that can occur on a property in order to preserve its natural character and agricultural potential.

When a landowner takes on a conservation easement there are associated financial benefits that can help landowners pass their property on to heirs or to new owners as a viable agricultural unit or a natural landscape.

Although conservation easements have been used in Alberta since 1996, many people are still unfamiliar with them. They are a flexible tool that help to meet landowner and land trust needs, but can also be quite complex. This booklet is not a replacement for the expert advice you need related to your individual situation – talk to your lawyer, your tax advisor, and your estate planner about what a conservation easement can mean for you.

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Energy Efficiency Savings Opportunities for Alberta’s Homeowners
By: Alberta Real Estate Association
Grant Number: 2017-07

The Alberta Real Estate Association (AREA) has partnered with the Pembina Institute to educate REALTORS® and their clients on the value of energy efficiency. As a collaboration, the project will leverage AREA’s expertise on the needs of REALTORS® and homeowners and the Pembina Institute’s expertise on clean energy, climate change and energy issues to transform how Alberta’s REALTORS® understand and serve homeowners on this topic of increasing importance.

This fact sheet outlines current energy efficiency savings opportunities in Alberta, offering more information on how you can take advantage of energy efficiency.

Look for more of these collaborative resources in the future.

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