The Standards of Professional Excellence
By: Alberta Real Estate Association
Grant Number: 2016-25

More than 90 per cent of Alberta consumers intend to employ a REALTOR® in their next real estate transaction. Three quarters of buyers and two-thirds of sellers plan to return to their same REALTOR® the next time they are considering a real estate transaction. But only one in two are likely to recommend that REALTOR® to friends and family, and younger consumers are significantly more critical of their experiences than baby boomers.

In Winter 2016-17, AREA conducted qualitative and quantitative market research on consumer and REALTOR® perceptions of REALTORS®, with funding support from the Alberta Real Estate Foundation. This research identified areas where REALTORS® are excelling, as well as areas REALTORS® can improve their service to clients.

 

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Socio-Economic Impact Assessment of the Shell Waterton Complex
By: Southwest Alberta Sustainable Community Initiative
Grant Number: 2016-16

Often, when a major industry or employer leaves a community, it tends to happen rather suddenly: recall when General Motors announced in November 2018 that it would close its Oshawa assembly plant by the end of 2019, putting nearly 3,000 people of out of work. In contrast, by announcing the potential closure of the Waterton Complex years in advance, Shell has given our community a unique opportunity to proactively plan for our future.

SASCI’s socio-economic impact assessment gives us fact-based evidence about the magnitude and scope of the potential impacts of the loss of this significant economic driver. Now, with that information in hand, SASCI will be turning its mind – as well as its expertise in community engagement, collaboration, capacity-building, and facilitation – to advancing diversification and resilience in the community. Our goal is to rally the community and put our collective energy, ingenuity, and entrepreneurship to work in shaping the economic future of our region.

 

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Nexus Water Brochure
By: Alberta Water Portal Society
Grant Number: 2016-20

Founded in 2006, in the spirit of the Water for Life strategy, the Alberta WaterPortal provides inclusive research, community engagement, and educational activities to improve the public’s understanding of the importance of water in Alberta, as well as providing Albertans with the knowledge needed to make better water management decisions.

Today’s water challenges and opportunities clearly cross many different jurisdictions, stakeholders and communities. Addressing the protection, allocation and management of our water resources and water systems requires creative mechanisms for dialogue and networking, as well as coordinated efforts to explore and share data and experiences among water users, managers, and researchers.

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Tenant Education Project
By: Camrose Open Door Association
Grant Number: 2016-24

Camrose Open Door Association is a regional non-profit organization that offers support services and hope to youth in need between the ages of 11-24. The Open Door offers support, effective services, and a safe place for youth in need to grow and transition into successful adulthood, becoming contributing members of the community. This pilot project will provide hard to house tenants with the knowledge, tools and support that they need in order to be successful renters. The project will incorporate development of workshop curriculum, education sessions, appropriate community referrals, security deposit assistance and ongoing support to assist the tenant in stabilizing their housing situation.

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The Alberta Water Nexus: Energy, Food, People
By: Alberta WaterPortal Society
Grant Number: 2016-20

Water is the nexus between food, energy, and people. Water is required to meet the demands of our growing population, to maintain and improve environmental health, and to support the production of food and energy. As the availability of water changes and our population grows meeting the demands in the Nexus will become increasingly challenging.

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Green Acreages Guide Primer
By: Land Stewardship Centre
Grant Number: 2016-14

As a landowner you want to do the right thing for your property. The Green Acreages Guide Primer, an introduction to rural living, can help you better understand what it means to be a rural property owner and identify stewardship practices that will help you conserve and protect the valuable natural assets associated with your property.

New content! The Green Acreages Guide Primer has been updated with new and updated links in “Further Resources” as well as new information for acreages owners on “Resource Development and Extraction” and “Easements and Rights-of-Way”.

 

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Challenges and Solutions in Acquiring Water for Housing Development
By: University of Lethbridge
Grant Number: 2016-03

A study in 2015 found preliminary evidence that in some municipalities in the Calgary region, housing developers are facing challenges when it comes to acquiring licensed water allocations for new housing developments (Nicol & Nicol, 2015). This study explored the issue of water challenges and housing development in more depth. The study focussed on housing development in three of the most water-stressed municipalities in the Calgary region – the municipalities of Rocky View County, M.D. Foothills and the town of Okotoks, and involved personal interviews with 15 housing developers in the region. The study considered four main lines of inquiry: (a) developers’ views of water challenges; (b) the nature and source of the problem; (c) the consequence of water challenges; and (d) solutions. An additional dimension of the study involved a preliminary assessment of the potential impact a decline in housing construction could have on the real estate sector.

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Best practices for responsible wind development in Alberta
By: Pembina Institute
Grant Number: 2016-02

In order to meet the Government of Alberta’s goal of generating 30% of electricity from renewable power sources by 2030, 5,000 megawatts (MW) will need to be added to the province’s electrical grid, with a large portion of this capacity coming from wind. However, if this additional wind power is going to gain social acceptance, it must be done in a way that is environmentally and socially responsible, to address the concerns of Albertans and maximize the benefits associated with wind development.

This report is based on a series of case studies, looking at examples in Alberta, the U.S., and Europe, examining the best practices for wind development. While this report does not represent an exhaustive list of best practices, it does offer some guidance for how wind projects can be responsibly developed in Alberta. Based on the research, there are several practices wind developers and governments can adopt to encourage stakeholders to accept wind projects.

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