The Newtonian Shift
By: Energy Futures Lab
Grant Number: 2016-01

The Newtonian Shift is a facilitated role-playing simulation that allows players to experience decades of energy transition in one day. It features dynamic and fast-paced experiential learning that puts participants in a diverse set of roles: energy producer, private customer, large energy consumer, First Nations, suppliers, grid operator, investors, and government.

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Citizens Commission on Municipal Infrastructure
By: Calgary Chamber
Grant Number: 2015-10

If Calgary is to meet its growing obligations in a more sustainable and financially responsible way, it is imperative for the municipality to critically examine its existing infrastructure funding model, and assess whether the best practices of other jurisdictions could be successfully applied in our own city for the benefit of existing and future residents.

This report provides an overview of the process and a summary of the Commission’s recommendations. and was written by the Commission’s project team.

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The Aging-in-Place Laneway Housing Research Project
By: University of Calgary - Faculty of Environmental Design
Grant Number: 2014-08

Calgary’s population is getting older. Seniors currently comprise 10% of Calgary’s population. This will increase to 20% by 2026. Unfortunately, most houses are designed for healthy young families. As a result, they are often ill-suited for the specific needs of older people and can be difficult, isolating, and even dangerous places for seniors to live. Many of these people end up having to move into dependent living facilities before it is medically necessary. Research indicates that 20-50% of older individuals currently waiting for beds could continue to live in the community if an appropriate independent housing option were available.

To meet this challenge, an interdisciplinary research team at the University of Calgary led by Professor John Brown is developing an innovative aging-in-place laneway housing option.

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Laws for Landlords and Tenants in Alberta
By: Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta
Grant Number: 2018-10
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Condo Law for Albertans
By: Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta
Grant Number: 2015-12

Condo Law for Albertans is a project of the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta (CPLEA) (legal name: Legal Resource Centre), a non-profit organization whose mission is to help people understand the law as it affects their everyday lives. We develop plain language online tools, publications, and presentations to help people recognize and respond to their legal rights and responsibilities.

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Green Acreages Guide Primer
By: Land Stewardship Centre
Grant Number: 2016-14

As a landowner you want to do the right thing for your property. The Green Acreages Guide Primer, an introduction to rural living, can help you better understand what it means to be a rural property owner and identify stewardship practices that will help you conserve and protect the valuable natural assets associated with your property.

New content! The Green Acreages Guide Primer has been updated with new and updated links in “Further Resources” as well as new information for acreages owners on “Resource Development and Extraction” and “Easements and Rights-of-Way”.

 

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Evict Radon
By: University of Calgary, Cumming School of Medicine
Grant Number: 2018-27

Canada contains many radon gas-generating regions and, because we have constructed population centres across all of them, radon is the primary cause of lung cancer in 10,000- 40,000 Canadians per decade. We have conducted detailed radon gas analysis of 11,000+ homes spread across Alberta and Saskatchewan, finding that 1 in 6 contain hazardous amounts of radon with newer homes in many regions (but not all) having much higher total radon. We have revealed an unknown “X factor” within environmental design practice across regions that is a major contributor to radon exposure, and our goal now is to understand this and develop solutions to protect the population. We aim to (i) identify modifiable behaviors and environmental design practices influencing chronic radon exposure in our changing world and (ii) define engineering and community intervention solutions applicable within the Canadian context to eliminate radon as a source of cancer in the future.

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WellWiki Alberta
By: University of Alberta – Alberta School of Business
Grant Number: 2017-15, 2020-10

WellWiki.org is a groundbreaking solution to the problem of information access and transparency related to data on oil and gas development. While in many cases some data on wells is publicly available, interested parties face an arcane and obscure process for accessing it which deters many from pursuing the information they need. WellWiki.org solves this problem, providing access to information in an easy-to-use format available to all, and has been successful across North America. Using WellWiki, Albertans can now access centralized information about any well in the province by searching well name, region, operating company name, municipality, license status, and other details.

WellWiki was recently expanded to include an advanced well search page – a functional search feature specifically designed with and for realtors. This new search interface uses the township system of meridian, range, township, and section to better align with the way realtors identify locations according to legal land descriptions.

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Rural Routes to Climate Solutions Podcast
By: Rural Routes to Climate Solutions
Grant Number: 2018-08

Farmers and ranchers can play a pivotal role in building the low-carbon economy of the future. Especially in Alberta, home to one-third of Canada’s agricultural land and two important carbon sinks—grasslands and the boreal forest. The wildrose province also has some of the best solar and wind power resources in Canada.

Climate solutions are often viewed as being an inconvenience to our everyday lives. But farm solutions are climate solutions and many of them have multiple concrete benefits that go beyond stopping climate change: improving soil fertility; creating new economic opportunities; protecting biodiversity; energy independence and building resiliency against droughts and floods. It is a win-win strategy.

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Canadian Rental Housing Index
By: BC Non-Profit Housing Association
Grant Number: 2017-21

The Index is a comprehensive database that compiles rental housing statistics for cities, regions, and provinces across Canada. See how much rent Canadians are paying in different parts of the country, compare affordability measures and find out where residents are overcrowded and severely overspending on housing.

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The Standards of Professional Excellence
By: Alberta Real Estate Association
Grant Number: 2016-25

More than 90 per cent of Alberta consumers intend to employ a REALTOR® in their next real estate transaction. Three quarters of buyers and two-thirds of sellers plan to return to their same REALTOR® the next time they are considering a real estate transaction. But only one in two are likely to recommend that REALTOR® to friends and family, and younger consumers are significantly more critical of their experiences than baby boomers.

In Winter 2016-17, AREA conducted qualitative and quantitative market research on consumer and REALTOR® perceptions of REALTORS®, with funding support from the Alberta Real Estate Foundation. This research identified areas where REALTORS® are excelling, as well as areas REALTORS® can improve their service to clients.

 

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Socio-Economic Impact Assessment of the Shell Waterton Complex
By: Southwest Alberta Sustainable Community Initiative
Grant Number: 2016-16

Often, when a major industry or employer leaves a community, it tends to happen rather suddenly: recall when General Motors announced in November 2018 that it would close its Oshawa assembly plant by the end of 2019, putting nearly 3,000 people of out of work. In contrast, by announcing the potential closure of the Waterton Complex years in advance, Shell has given our community a unique opportunity to proactively plan for our future.

SASCI’s socio-economic impact assessment gives us fact-based evidence about the magnitude and scope of the potential impacts of the loss of this significant economic driver. Now, with that information in hand, SASCI will be turning its mind – as well as its expertise in community engagement, collaboration, capacity-building, and facilitation – to advancing diversification and resilience in the community. Our goal is to rally the community and put our collective energy, ingenuity, and entrepreneurship to work in shaping the economic future of our region.

 

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