New U of L study finds water issues a major concern of housing developers in the Calgary region

The final report of a study investigating challenges and solutions in acquiring water for housing development in the Calgary provides some insights into this critical issue.

Principal investigator, Dr. Lorraine Nicol of the University of Lethbridge issued the final report after analysing the findings from interviews with 15 major developers working in Rocky View County, M.D. Foothills and/or Okotoks. Challenges in acquiring water have housing developers in the Calgary region worried about the effects on their industry and real estate, on home buyers and the economy in general.

The study found:

  • 100% of developers interviewed believe there are challenges in acquiring licensed water allocations for housing development in the three municipalities under study;
  • 73% stated acquiring a licensed water allocation is the ‘primary issue’ for developers;
  • 60% of interviewees believe water management in the region is political, to the detriment of the housing industry;
  • another 53% believe the source of the problem also relates to government processes;
  • 87% of developers believe water challenges are having a negative effect on the industry, either now or in the future;
  • two-thirds of developers say the cost of acquiring water licenses increases the price of homes;
  • on average, approximately 200 homes sold yearly in the three municipalities under study comprised the resale of new homes. A 10% decline in houses constructed, by reducing the stock of homes, could translate in a decline of 20 houses hold; a 20% decline in new home construction could translate in a decline of 40 homes sold;

All developers believe a solution lies in working together as a region but there was no clear consensus on what type of regional model will work.

For more information about this study, visit the University of Lethbridge’s website here or Alberta WaterPortal’s Blog here.

New Tool Available to Assist with Community Energy Plan Implementation 

An open source guide, the Community Energy Implementation Framework, designed to help communities move Community Energy Plans from a vision to implementation, was released today in beta at QUEST2016 – Smart Energy Communities for Jobs, Infrastructure and Climate Action by the Community Energy Association, QUEST – Quality Urban Energy Systems of Tomorrow, and Sustainable Prosperity.

The Community Energy Implementation Framework contains 10 strategies that provide advice on political, staff and stakeholder engagement, staff and financial capacity and embedding energy into local government plans and processes.

“Across Canada, over 200 communities, representing more than 50 percent of the population, have a Community Energy Plan.” said Dale Littlejohn, Executive Director of the Community Energy Association, “Despite the acceleration of community energy planning across Canada, communities continue to face challenges when it comes to implementation, and this guide offers a tool to overcome many of those challenges.”

Laid out in an easy to use online format, the Framework also includes an Implementation Readiness Survey – a self-evaluation tool intended to help communities identify areas of strength and weakness for implementation.

“Canadian communities have an important role to play in energy. They influence nearly 60 percent of energy use and 50 percent of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions nationally,” explains Brent Gilmour, Executive Director of QUEST. “The Community Energy Implementation Framework offers a solution to help communities do their part in helping Canada meet its GHG emission reduction targets.”

The GTI team welcomes you to share comments and questions about the beta version of the Framework to smarchionda@questcanada.org.

For more information: Access the Framework: http://www.framework.gettingtoimplementation.ca

About Community Energy Association (CEA)

CEA supports local governments in developing and implementing community energy and emissions plans (also known as climate action plans, community energy plans, and local action plans). We also help local governments with carbon neutral action plans for their operations.

About QUEST

QUEST is the leader advancing Smart Energy Communities that reduce GHG emissions, lower energy use, drive the adoption of clean technologies, and foster local economic development in Canada. Established in 2007, QUEST has a national grassroots network including over 10,000 contacts in organizations across Canada from local, provincial and territorial governments, utilities, energy service providers, building and land owners and operators, and clean technology companies working at the community level to advance Smart Energy Communities. Follow us: @QUESTCanada

About Sustainable Prosperity (SP)

SP is a national research and policy network, based at the University of Ottawa. SP focuses on market-based approaches to build a greener, more competitive economy. It brings together business, policy and academic leaders to help innovative ideas inform policy development. Follow us: @sustpro

For additional information:

QUEST

Tonja Leach, Director, Communications & National Affairs

Tel.: 613-627-2938 x706

E: tleach@questcanada.org

 

Community Energy Association

Dale Littlejohn , Executive Director

Tel.: 604-628-7076

E: dlittlejohn@communityenergy.bc.ca

Foundation seeks new Public Board Member

The Foundation is seeking a candidate to fill the position of Public Appointment on the Board of Governors.

As a Governor you will:

  • Participate in three meetings a year;
  • Contribute to the strategic direction of the Foundation;
  • Decide upon community investment grant funding;
  • Contribute to a dynamic learning board and organization;
  • Develop and grow your skills and provide leadership to projects in Alberta.

According to the Ministerial Regulations, the Foundation is seeking one person, who is not in the industry, who is appointed by the current members of the board then in office and who, in the opinion of those members, possesses special skills or experience to assist the board in carrying out the Foundation’s purposes.

Preference will be given to a candidate who brings the following:

  • Is energetic and willing to be an ambassador for the Foundation to network and create awareness among community and industry stakeholders.
  • Knowledge of Alberta, current issues and the ability to identify grant making and community investment opportunities.
  • Holds respect for diverging viewpoints and is willing to contribute their personal leadership skills towards creating efficient and effective governance.
  • An appetite for learning and able to set appropriate ends and monitor the achievement of those ends.
  • An independent thinker who bases their decision making on analysis of available information and their own experiences.
  • Experience with financial management and investment responsibilities – current assets of the Foundation are around $15 million.

For more information, please view the complete description here or contact the Executive Director, Cheryl De Paoli, at 403.228.4786 or cdepaoli@aref.ab.ca (Indicate in the subject line: Board Public Appointment).

All applications are due by October 31st, 2016.

September 2016 Community Investment

The Board of Governors of the Alberta Real Estate Foundation approved $239,500 in community investment projects at their recent meeting.

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation (AREF) supports initiatives that enhance the real estate industry and benefit the communities of Alberta. AREF was set up in 1991 under the Alberta Real Estate Act. Since then, it has awarded approximately 17 million dollars in community and industry grants to over 550 projects across Alberta. AREF is currently celebrating its 25th Anniversary of making a difference in Alberta.

Projects approved at the September meeting include:

Alberta Real Estate AssociationDefining Professional Excellence through Research and Engagement

AREA would like to improve the Alberta real estate industry’s understanding of true professional excellence, defining it with statistically relevant, benchmark Alberta consumer research, as well as member and key stakeholder input. Using these publicly released research results, AREA will develop applicable and measurable Standards of Professional Excellence for the Industry.

Alberta Real Estate Foundation Community and Real Estate Industry Sponsorship 2016-2017

The Foundation utilises the Community and Real Estate Industry Sponsorship program to provide sponsorships and small community grants to those events and projects that require a timely decision. The purpose of providing sponsorships is to offer limited support to organizations and their events that meet the funding criteria of the Foundation. The fund reduces administrative demands by allowing staff to award small grants without seeking Board approval.

 Alberta WaterPortal Society The Future of Water: Engaging Albertans in the Water-Food-Energy Nexus

Alberta is projected to add 1.8 million residents by 2040. Over the same time period, climate change may lead to a reduction in available water resources. In this context, an understanding of the converging demands for water from communities, as well as the energy and food production sectors is critical. Ultimately, this project will engage stakeholders to encourage consideration of the water-food-energy nexus and support more holistic water management decision making.

Camrose Open Door Association Tenant Education and Certification Pilot Project

This pilot project will provide hard to house tenants with the knowledge, tools and support that they need in order to be successful renters. The project will incorporate development of workshop curriculum, education sessions, appropriate community referrals, security deposit assistance and ongoing support to assist the tenant in stabilizing their housing situation.

Friends of Fish Creek Provincial Park Society Community Engagement 25

2017 is the Friends of Fish Creek Provincial Park Society’s 25th anniversary year. As such, the Society will be highlighting their achievements over the past 25 years and providing new and exciting ways to get involved in the Fish Creek Park community. By leveraging skilled staff and volunteers to provide outreach activities, hands on stewardship, engagement activities and social enterprise, a core of informed park users will be supported by a stable non-profit society. This project will enable the Society to continue to improve the quality of life for Calgary families and support local real estate values far into the future.

FuseSocial – Building Community Resilience Together

After the devastating wildfires, Wood Buffalo (WB) has the opportunity to implement a process to build a more resilient community. This requires a community engagement process, to ensure ownership by the community. This project aims to utilizing a strategic, comprehensive and innovative approach/tool – The WB Strategy Roadmap – to better understand the challenges facing the community and identify priority areas for the community’s recovery effort.

Hearts & Hammers SocietyHearts and Hammers, Affordable and Accessible Home Renovations

Hearts and Hammers offers free home renovations to Calgarians with mobility challenges. For the past 4 years, the organization has been run by volunteers, and has been able to complete up to 5 renovations a year.  As the organization experiences more demand, full-time staff are needed to ensure sustainability and strategic growth.  Bringing on more staff capacity would allow H&H to continue providing home renovations for Calgarians with reduced mobility, while also enhancing their social support.

LifehouseAlive Inside: A Full Body Experience

Alive Inside, is a full body experience that allows participants the opportunity to explore the limitations of aging. This educational workshop will expose Realtors and other influential community members to a reality which will help them deeply understand how environment impacts mobility, behaviour, health and healing. Awareness will encourage the development of environments that are accessible to everyone, including aging populations and those with disabilities. This immersive experience will inform and empower REALTORS® and other influential community members so they can help to further educate and support aging in place.

Stewards of the Lac la Biche WatershedLac la Biche Sensitive Habitat Inventory Mapping

Living Lakes Canada and the Stewards of the Lac la Biche Watershed, and with support from Lac La Biche County, are conducting a Sensitive Habitat Inventory Mapping Project for Lac la Biche. Sensitive Habitat Inventory Mapping was developed by Fisheries and Oceans Canada, as a method to conduct fish and wildlife habitat assessments of freshwater lakes. The information collected includes land use, riparian habitat alterations and existing sensitive fish and wildlife habitats on both public and private land. The resulting Shoreline Management Guidelines direct shoreline activities in a manner that will protect, conserve and restore important fish and wildlife habitats and the water they depend on. The Guidelines have proven invaluable for local and provincial government to make sustainable land use decisions along our lake shorelines.

Sustainability Resources Ltd.Rural Prosperity Initiative

The Rural Prosperity Initiative is a collaborative programmatic approach to showcasing and implementing sustainability solutions in Alberta’s communities. The Rural Prosperity Initiative is a collaboration between industry, local and provincial governments, non-government organizations and institutions to help communities identify opportunities for waste reduction and repurposing, water reuse, and clean and renewable energy infrastructure upgrades that can save money, attract industry and reduce carbon and GHG.

Accessible U is coming your way

Wanda’s father lives in an inner-city bungalow and he wants to stay in his home for as long as possible but he has been struggling to get around with his new walker. Wanda has been struggling to find practical ways to help him make modifications to his home so that he stays safe and healthy.

Ajay is looking for a new place to live after his son was in an accident that left him a paraplegic. Ajay isn’t sure what to look for, where to start, or what sort of housing his son will need in the next few years as he adjusts to his new life. He’s even reached out to home builders about building something brand new and to a realtor to help him find something appropriate.

Amal and Peter brought their newborn daughter home from the hospital and suddenly realized that with her significant physical disability, their home will need major renovations as she grows.

Carole has been using her wheelchair more frequently because her MS is becoming increasingly debilitating. Amongst many challenges in her home, navigating the multiple sets of stairs are a constant worry. She’s wondering what she could do to her home to maintain her independence for as long as possible.

Later this year, people like these will be able to find valuable resources on Accessible U, a new online knowledge hub which will offer help navigating the world of accessibility, barrier-free design and home modifications. Accessible U is an initiative launched by Accessible Housing, a Calgary not-for-profit organization operating since 1974 with a vision that everyone has a home and belongs in community. Created in response to weekly queries from individuals like these, and with the generous support of AREF, Accessible U will put the power of information back into the hands of the community and will be relevant and relatable to families, realtors, home builders, health care professionals and more. Along with the site launch, workshops and learning opportunities will be held to specific audience groups to help share the valuable knowledge long held in the minds of industry professionals, health care workers and people with the lived experience of disability.

Watch for the launch and learning opportunities later this month!

 

RECA Seeking Real Estate Industry Member for Alberta Real Estate Foundation

The Real Estate Council of Alberta (RECA) is seeking a real estate industry member to sit as Governor on the Alberta Real Estate Foundation (AREF). The term of the appointment is 3 years commencing November 1, 2016 ending October 31, 2019.

AREF supports and originates initiatives that enhance the real estate industry and benefit the people of Alberta. The Real Estate Act states AREF’s purpose is to promote and undertake:

  • the education of related professionals and the public in respect of the real estate industry
  • law reform and research in respect of the real estate industry
  • other projects and activities to advance and improve the real estate industry.

AREF’s Board of Governors is comprised of industry and public volunteers. The AREF’s Governors are responsible for fiduciary matters, investing in community initiatives, attending board meetings, and representing the Foundation at related events.

The Foundation is seeking a candidate who supports the mission, vision, and values of the organisation and embodies the following characteristics:

  • is energetic and willing to be an ambassador for the Foundation to network and create awareness among community and industry stakeholders
  • knowledge of Alberta, current issues and the ability to identify grant making and community investment opportunities
  • solid analytical skills and an appetite for learning
  • holds respect for diverging viewpoints and is willing to contribute their personal leadership skills towards creating efficient and effective governance
  • set appropriate ends and monitor the achievement of those ends
  • independent thinker who base their decision making on analysis of available information and their own experiences
  • experience with financial management and investment responsibilities – current assets of the Foundation are around $14 million
  • The Governors collectively make decisions about each project to create successful and meaningful results that benefit the people of Alberta.

If you are interested in applying to serve as an AREF Governor, please forward a letter of introduction and resume no later than September 19, 2016 to: Rina Hawkins, Executive Assistant  Real Estate Council of Alberta  Suite 350, Richard Road SW  Calgary, Alberta T3E 6L1  E-mail: rhawkins@reca.ca or Fax: 403.228.3065

Note: RECA would like to thank all individuals who apply for this position. Please note an expression of interest does not guarantee an interview or committee position.

It’s about time! A quick and easy way to list and find space to rent

By: Joni Carroll, Arts Spaces Consultant, Calgary Arts Development

Just over five years ago I was asked to help find spaces for three functions: an auditorium for my kids’ school’s spring concert, a boardroom for my favourite non-profit’s AGM, and an office space for an arts organization. After hours of phone calls and web searches I thought that there must be a one-stop online listing of all the bookable space.

And there was—in New York City. It was called Spacefinder and it was developed by NYC’s Fractured Atlas, a non-profit arts service organization.

SpaceFinder is now in Alberta. With the support of the Alberta Real Estate Foundation, Calgary Arts Development has partnered with ArtsBuild Ontario, Arts Habitat Edmonton with the Edmonton Chamber of Voluntary Organizations, and Fractured Atlas to bring SpaceFinder to Albertans. SpaceFinder is an free marketplace for hourly, daily, weekly and long-term rentals. This online tool to help Albertans get more use out of existing space. Less existing space will go under-used less often.

SpaceFinder Alberta is live online and looking for people who need space. This free online marketplace links organizations with space to rent with those who need space. It is free to list. It is free to search. Did I mention it was free?

SpaceFinder helps venues efficiently find suitable users for their under-used space through this online tool. And it helps users find suitable space by streamlining the search for appropriate and affordable space.

The momentum is growing. In addition to Alberta, SpaceFinder has launched in Toronto and is underway in other regions of Ontario as well as BC and Manitoba.

SpaceFinder Alberta meets a dire need in our communities. Many groups in the creative, non-profit and small business communities need space for meeting, creating, rehearsing, presenting, collaborating, gathering or celebrating. They spend a lot of time trying to find suitable and affordable spaces—and SpaceFinder Alberta provides that information on a one-stop-shopping site, free of charge.

SpaceFinder Alberta can help venues reach new prospects, respond to inquiries and confirm appropriate renters very efficiently. Organizations spend significant resources trying to find the right renters for their spaces. Organizations can list their spaces free of charge on SpaceFinder Alberta. Help is available at calgaryartsdevelopment.com. Or in the Edmonton area, contact Arts Habitat Edmonton at artshab.com.

What kinds of spaces can be listed on SpaceFinder Alberta? Any space that supports creative uses in our communities. For many Albertans, arts spaces are where the arts are presented to audiences. But spaces are needed for every link in the value chain including creation space, rehearsal space, production space, warehouse and storage space and office space through to presentation and performance space. SpaceFinder Alberta lists spaces to support all disciplines. It supports community arts, professional arts and education in the arts.

Realtors know their community and its facilities. Venues listed on SpaceFinder Alberta include educational, commercial, faith-based, industrial, and institutional spaces. They can be for-profit and not-for-profit. They can be downtown or in suburbs.

If you know of a venue that makes space available, ask them to list their space on SpaceFinder Alberta. If you know of a group that is searching for space, please tell them about SpaceFinder Alberta. SpaceFinder Alberta: List a space. Find a space. For free.

In Conversation: Neighbourhoods and the Future of the Suburb

By: Design Talks (d.talks)

In May d.talks hosted “Let’s talk about…neighbourhoods,” a conversation exploring the relationship of built form with the potential for growth. Supported in part by the Alberta Real Estate Foundation and open to the public, the discussion fused perspectives on housing, urban design, planning, development and the social fabric of our neighbourhoods.

We wondered what role design might play in creating adaptability. What might the suburb 2.0 look like?

Calgary is a collection of neighbourhoods. What Calgary’s streetcar in the early 1900s and today’s LRT system allow is the opportunity to define neighbourhoods with multiple kinds of mobility in mind. We wondered how urban habitat might evolve and how everyday errands might be done differently in a future suburb.

June Williamson—author of Designing Suburban Futures as well as co-author of Retrofitting Suburbia: Urban Design Solutions for Redesigning Suburbs—showed the significant role design plays in “bettering” existing built form. Jamal Ramjohn, the Manager of Community Planning at The City of Calgary, surveyed the evolution of community form. Over six decades there is a return to rethinking the grid.

The relationship of policy and design was explored. Susanne Schindler, in sharing a multi-year research project called House Housing: An Untimely History of Real Estate, identified how housing alternatives are shaped. And sharing a Zurich cooperative housing example that blends micro-units, cluster-living, mixed income and seniors…what opportunities might allow housing to align with lifestyle changes over time?

Grace Lui, Senior Manager of Strategic Initiatives at Brookfield Residential, brought observations on livability indexing and the opportunity to transform single-use institutions like schools or libraries with shared-use alternatives. Urban Sociologist Jyoti Gondek, the Director of the Westman Centre for Real Estate Studies at the University of Calgary’s Haskayne School of Business, deepened the definition of a suburb. Communities in Calgary’s Northeast are flush with multi-generational families, forcing a re-think on the scale of some single family homes. What if density were defined as persons per unit instead of households per acre?

We heard: design nimbly and revitalize vacancy with alternative uses. Reconnect individuals with community and consider sharing. Today we lease phones and share cars, what will tomorrow’s generation of residents be sharing? A question from the audience asked how backyards might become shared laneway between homes. For now, the future is open with room for alternatives to emerge over time.

For more information on other d.talks events please visit: dtalks.org.

How much do Albertans love the wilderness?

By: CPAWS Southern Alberta Chapter

Alberta is home to an amazing landscape and Albertans know it. You can hop in your car and be in the middle of wilderness in little more than an hour.  The accessibility to nature and getting outside is an incredible draw and asset to this province.  Although we know Albertans are drawn to the outdoors, CPAWS wanted to dig deeper and ask Albertans about our parks and wilderness, specifically are they spending time outdoors, what activities are they doing and what are their values and attitudes towards nature?

To do this, CPAWS commissioned a province wide poll, funded in part by the Alberta Real Estate Foundation, on Albertans’ recreation and wilderness values. The survey, created with input from academics, partners, stakeholders and most importantly an outside consultant (the Praxis Group), was designed to be credible and statistically representative of all Albertans.   Although recreation surveys have been done in the past, none of them have encompassed both outdoor activities and wilderness values on a province-wide scale.

Then Need

At CPAWS we felt we needed to get a better and more comprehensive understanding of how Albertans are using the land to help inform better planning decisions for the future of Alberta. As Alberta’s population grows, more people are getting outside and into our parks and wilderness areas. We wanted to learn about what is actually happening on the landscape.  With more demand, low impact sustainable recreation is going to play a bigger role and we will need to properly plan in order to safeguard environmentally sensitive areas.

Recent concerns about infrastructure-based commercial development in places like Banff National Park despite huge public opposition and lack of demand, and high impact activities, like motorized recreation, that have a significant impact in places like the Castle and Ghost, indicate a need to look at what people want from their outdoor experience and how they value our wilderness areas. We need to make sure that land-use decisions are in the interests of the majority of Albertans and that we protect and grow our amazing parks and wilderness areas in the province, reflecting Albertans’ values.

Results

The results of the survey showed that 76% or three quarters of all Albertans get outside and enjoy the wilderness of Alberta on a regular basis! The majority value quiet recreation and 88% want more wilderness protection.  It is important to note that most Albertans are engaging in low impact recreation like hiking and camping and that that 86% prefer non-motorized recreation.

Some other key stats from the survey are:

  • 76% participate in some form of outdoor recreation
  • 98% want protection of water to take precedence over industrial development
  • 88% want governments to preserve more wilderness
  • 94% of Albertans believe that wilderness areas are important because they preserve plant and animal species
  • 86% prefer non-motorized recreation in wilderness areas over motorized recreation
  • 83% want wilderness protected and left in its natural condition even if these areas are never visited by, or benefit, humans.

So clearly, Albertans love and strongly value their wilderness areas. The most surprising result for CPAWS was that 83% of Albertans indicated that they wanted wilderness protected even if they never visit those areas. This tells us that people recognize the value of nature and they are willing to make tradeoffs to protect it for future generations.

The survey results have been shared widely with municipalities, recreation groups, the real estate industry, government officials and land managers so that this information representing Albertans can be used in formal land use decisions and recreation planning.  CPAWS feels the project has been rewarding is making an impact.  We have had people and groups quoting the survey results in meetings, pushing for land use practices that are representative of the majority Albertans.

What is next? CPAWS will make sure the results are widely available and continue to make efforts to present, share and promote this important work. CPAWS wants to see decision-makers have the information they need to plan for the protection of the environment such as headwaters, forests and wildlife corridors while considering the needs of the multiple recreation users in Alberta.

We are also working on encouraging people to get outside and sustainably connect with nature through outreach and creation of a series of videos highlighting sustainable recreation opportunities in Alberta. The first video highlights snowshoeing in Peter Lougheed Provincial Park.

Now that we know how much people appreciate these areas, we hope they will be empowered to be stewards of our parks and wilderness areas and use their voices to advocate for better land management and more protected areas in our province. We can enjoy economic benefits, great recreational places and prioritize ecologically sensitive areas. We can have an even better Alberta, we just need to plan for it.

To read the full report on Albertans’ Values and Attitudes Towards Recreation and Wilderness visit http://cpaws-southernalberta.org/campaigns/survey-albertans-want-more-wilderness-protected

Utilities Consumer Advocate (UCA) has launched its redesigned website

Service Alberta through the Utilities Consumer Advocate (UCA) has launched its redesigned website.

This new, interactive resource will help consumers, especially vulnerable Albertans; make informed choices about their electricity and natural gas services.

The website is mobile and tablet responsive and has several innovative new features, all of which are intended to provide a high quality user/consumer experience:

• An interactive Cost Comparison Tool to give consumers the delivered cost of energy;

• Prominent and clear information about the services of the UCA’s Consumer Mediation Team;

• Revamped content that’s easy to read, understand and ensures search engine optimization (SEO); and

• A searchable database that displays historical natural gas and electricity rates in a user-friendly format.

Visit: http://ucahelps.alberta.ca/

 

EPL hosts Dr. Tim Beatley & Edmonton joins the Biophilic Cities Network

By: Edmonton Public Library

The Edmonton Public Library (EPL) was pleased to bring Dr. Tim Beatley to speak about Becoming a Biophilic City as part of our Forward Thinking Speaker Series. The event, held at the Stanley A. Milner Library Theatre on June 2, was supported by the Alberta Real Estate Foundation with a 25th Anniversary grant. Dr. Beatley was the seventh speaker in our series, which began nearly two years ago, and reflects our rich history of taking risks, trying new things and redefining the modern library. Through our Forward Thinking Speaker Series, we bring in a wide variety of thought leaders to challenge and inspire Edmontonians, and to help build a resilient and supportive community.

The enthusiastic response from Edmontonians was apparent, with more than 200 people in attendance. Dr. Beatley, an internationally recognized sustainable city researcher and author, shared examples of Biophilia from around the world and encouraged guests to start incorporating it into their everyday lives in order to further integrate nature in our communities. At the end of Dr. Beatley’s presentation, City of Edmonton Chief Planner Peter Ohm announced Edmonton has passed a resolution to join the Biophilic Cities Network.

We are thrilled those in attendance were reminded we need nature in our lives more than ever today, and how to care about, protect, restore and grow urban nature. We all now better understand how cities become more biophilic, and how important it is for us to tell the stories of the places and people building these urban-nature connections.

EPL is extremely thankful for the Alberta Real Estate Foundation, and their generosity in funding the event with a grant. It wouldn’t have happened without your support!

Feedback from attendees:

“It was interesting; I was glad to learn what a Biophilic city is, and that Edmonton has ‘joined the club.’”

“I’m glad there was a forum for something that is about making our world a better place!”

Click here to learn more about the Biophilic Cities Network.

EPL Twitter

June 2016 Community Investment

The Board of Governors of the Alberta Real Estate Foundation approved $235,000 in community investment projects at their recent meeting.

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation (AREF) supports initiatives that enhance the real estate industry and benefit the communities of Alberta. AREF was set up in 1991 under the Alberta Real Estate Act. Since then, it has awarded approximately 17 million dollars in community and industry grants to over 550 projects across Alberta.

AREF is currently celebrating its 25th Anniversary of making a difference in Alberta. To celebrate we launched a new area of interest call Community Innovation and will be highlighting past grantees. Keep in touch with AREF through our website or on Twitter (@arefabca) to ensure you do not miss out on what is to come!

Projects approved at the June meeting include:

Alberta Energy Efficiency Alliance Maximizing Alberta’s Energy Efficiency Opportunity (Land Stewardship and Environment)

To date, the Alberta Energy Efficiency Alliance (AEEA) has made significant progress in motivating the creation of new energy efficiency programs for Alberta. These programs will lead to about $300 million of program funding over the next three years, but investments past that time are still uncertain. With this project, the AEEA proposes to work with government and stakeholders to help ensure Alberta’s new EE programs continue beyond a three year horizon and grow over time.

Institute for Community Prosperity Vivacity (Community Innovation)

Vivacity is an inter-institututional collaboration between 6 post-secondary institutions and Calgary Economic Development. Vivacity engages inter-disciplinary teams of students in the re-design and activation of community spaces in vacant and underutilized areas of the city.

Calgary Aging In Place Co-operative Operations Start-Up (Housing)

The Calgary Aging-in-Place Co-operative is designed to find ways to support our aging communities, so individuals can afford to stay in their homes, as they age. In finding everyday affordable services based on the needs of each member we can ensure that everyone has an opportunity to “age-in-place.”

Land Stewardship Centre of Canada The Green Acreages Guide Primer Re-print (Land Stewardship and Environment)

This project will see the update and re-print of a wildly successful education and awareness tool, The Green Acreages Guide Primer. The Primer will be updated with content which was identified by partners as a necessary instalment to fulfilling landowners’ educational needs. By project end, realtors, stewards and Albertans everywhere will again have access to a key resource to assist them in sustainably managing their property for the benefit of the environment.

Inside Education E3/C3 Project (Education and Research)

An experiential energy efficiency and climate change education and action program for Edmonton, Calgary and surrounding areas junior high and high school students. Two parallel learning experiences – Edmonton Energy Efficiency (E3) and Calgary Climate Change (C3) – will provide students real-world insight into energy conservation in their lives at school and home today and into the future.

Southwest Alberta Sustainable Community Initiative (SASCI) Planning for a Sustainable Economic Future in Pincher Creek (Education and Research)

This project will establish a factual basis for understanding potential economic and social/community impacts that may occur with closure of the Waterton Complex, and to use that foundation to inform and facilitate dialogue with and action by the affected communities regarding transition to a sustainable economy.

The Alex The Alex Community Food Centre (Community Innovation)

All of The Alex’s programs build a community of healthy individuals by understanding how to tackle complex social issues that are the source of hunger, poverty, and poor health. The Community Food Centre joins our growing family of preventative programs through a national partnership that has seen proven results. By connecting people with healthy food, skills, and education, the Community Food Centre provides a ground-breaking, results-oriented solution that makes real change in our community.

Pembina Institute for Appropriate Development Alberta Landowner’s Guide to Oil and Gas Development: Phase Two (Education and Research)

In light of the significant changes to operations and regulations that impact landowners, and the expansion of oil and gas operations since the last Landowner’s Guide was released, there is strong demand from landowners, municipalities, governments and real estate professionals for the tools to approach development issues knowledgeably. The Pembina Institute is uniquely positioned to deliver this tool in the form of the updated Landowner’s Guide.

Real Estate Council of Alberta Partners with University of Alberta School of Business to Raise the Bar in Commercial Real Estate Education

Calgary, Alberta – Commercial real estate education in Alberta will take an enormous step forward with a new partnership between the Real Estate Council of Alberta (RECA) and the University of Alberta.

RECA and the Alberta School of Business at the University of Alberta have entered into an agreement that will see the University’s business school develop a completely new Practice of Commercial Real Estate course. RECA will offer the course to individuals entering Alberta’s commercial real estate sector.

“RECA is extremely excited about this new partnership,” says Council Chair, Krista Bolton. “This is the first time RECA has partnered with a university for course development. Commercial practitioners have told us the current commercial real estate education in Alberta doesn’t go far enough; the new commercial course will be a game-changer.”

The Alberta School of Business already offers real estate courses as part of its Bachelor of Commerce and MBA programs. Its experience in these areas makes it the perfect partner to develop RECA’s new leading-edge, university-level commercial real estate course.

Edmonton commercial real estate professional Chad Griffiths, who was Council Chair when RECA and the University of Alberta signed a Memorandum of Agreement, strongly supports the partnership and the new course. “From what I have seen of the planned course content, this truly is going to be the pre-eminent commercial real estate course in Canada.”

The new Practice of Commercial Real Estate course offered by RECA will launch in phases, beginning in Fall 2016. As each phases launches, RECA will incorporate it into the current Practice of Commercial Real Estate course.

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation, a funder and supporter of the Real Estate Program, has provided the Alberta School of Business with a $150,000 grant to partially fund the development of the new course.

To read the Real Estate Council of Alberta’s (RECA) announcement please visit their website here.

Congratulation to ALUS in Alberta on their win of the Shared Footprints Award!

Alternative Land Use Services (ALUS) in Alberta was awarded the Shared Footprints Award at the 25th Annual Emerald Awards, held on Thursday, June 8th at TELUS Spark.

“It’s such a thrill to accept the Shared Footprints Award, sponsored by the Alberta Real Estate Foundation,” said Christine Campbell, ALUS Canada’s Western Hub Manager, in her acceptance speech. “For ALUS, winning the Emerald Award is proof of something we’ve always known: Albertans appreciate the environmental stewardship work that farmers and ranchers are doing, for all our sakes.”

The Shared Footprints Award recognizes excellence in Integrated Land Management (ILM)—a strategic planned approach to managing and reducing the human-caused footprint on public and/or private land. All of the finalist in this category demonstrate collaboration, dedication and creativity in working to improve and enhance land use practices in Alberta.

ALUS Canada is a community-led, farmer-delivered program that supports stewardship activities on agricultural lands. ALUS programs have been established in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec and Prince Edward Island. In all ALUS communities, farmers and ranchers obtain support to enable them to produce valuable ecological goods and services on their lands, via such activities as establishing or restoring wetlands, flood mitigation, carbon sequestration, creating wildlife habitat such as native Prairie pollinator strips, and more.

The County of Vermilion River adopted ALUS in 2010 as a means to address the loss of wetlands and other conservation issues associated with land-use changes in the area. Parkland County and Red Deer County quickly followed suit. Ten provincial municipalities have now adopted the ALUS program, with many more having expressed interest in joining this pioneering network. Together, Alberta’s ALUS communities are bridging the gap between environmental and agricultural activities by building a network of farmers and ranchers to lead conservation efforts throughout the province.

This is the third year the Alberta Real Estate Foundation has sponsored this award.

To read ALUS Canada’s press release visit their website here: PRESS RELEASE – ALUS Wins Alberta Emerald Award.

To see previous recipients of the Shared Footprints Award, visit the Alberta Emerald Foundation website here.

ALUS and AREF

Staff and Board from ALUS and AREF at the 25th Annual Emerald Awards (click to enlarge)

Alberta Septic Maintenance Pilot Program Launched

Partners come together to support responsible management of private onsite wastewater systems

By: Land Stewardship Centre

For rural homeowners, private onsite wastewater systems (septic systems) are often the only option for treating their household wastewater. How these systems are used, and the decisions homeowners make about how to manage and maintain their septic systems have the potential to have a significant cumulative effect on the Alberta landscape, the environment and our water resources.

The potential for operation issues or failures increases without routine maintenance. These failures can result in contamination of surface water and groundwater, and also pose a health risk to people and animals exposed to untreated wastewater.

Unfortunately, landowners in Alberta have not always had access to the information, resources and support that can help them responsibly manage their systems. So, in early 2015, Land Stewardship Centre (LSC), in partnership with Alberta Onsite Wastewater Management Association (AOWMA) launched Septic Sense, an onsite wastewater system education and outreach pilot program for landowners in Alberta.

“Surface water contamination from poorly managed and maintained septic systems can be an issue, especially around more developed recreational lakes. The Septic Sense pilot program is a proactive, collaborative approach to educating landowners, and helping them properly manage and maintain their septic systems can help address this concern,” says Amrita Grewal, Program Research Coordinator with LSC.

This multi-agency initiative is being rolled out as a one-year pilot project in order to implement, test and evaluate the feasibility of developing a full-fledged septic system operation and maintenance workshop program in Alberta. LSC and AOWMA have engaged representatives from government, municipalities and industry to serve on a Steering Committee and provide oversight for the pilot program. Alberta Municipal Affairs, Alberta Environment and Sustainable Resource Development, Agriculture and Rural Development, in addition to the Alberta Association of Municipal Districts and Counties (AAMDC) and the Association of Summer Villages of Alberta (ASVA), have all been approached to join the Steering Committee.

Similar in format and style, and an excellent complement to the province’s long-standing Working Well program (www.workingwell.alberta.ca), the Septic Sense pilot program will offer a range of educational opportunities and resource materials for landowners, including a workshop and a homeowner’s guide developed by wastewater management experts that covers various types of septic systems and ways to cost-effectively maintain septic system. Program information will include an overview of the relevant legislation governing onsite wastewater systems and stress the importance of having licensed contractors design and install systems to ensure they meet all guidelines and requirements. Appropriate use and maintenance of septic systems, and a troubleshooting guide that addresses common issues and questions will also be included.

The response from municipalities and other organizations for this type of program has been extremely positive, and many have expressed how useful such a program will be to landowners.

For more information on the Septic Sense pilot program, contact AOWMA www.aowma.com or LSC www.landstewardship.org.

25 years of celebrating environmental successes with the Emerald Awards

From a couple that’s revived a Cree water blessing at the Battle River to teachers that inspire students, from projects at giant corporations to a young woman who worked in her basement to clean tailings ponds—the Alberta Emerald Awards shines a light on hundreds of environmental stars across the province.

“Since we began in 1992, the Emerald Awards have showcased 280 recipients from across Alberta in sectors from business, government, youth, individuals schools and more, each with its own unique environmental success story,” says Carmen Boyko, Executive Director, Alberta Emerald Foundation (AEF). “By showcasing the incredible dedication and hard work of the Emerald Award finalists and recipients we hope to inspire everyone to take a look at their everyday environmental habits and practices, helping to build toward a healthier more vibrant environment.”

As well as the Emerald Awards, the AEF holds Emerald Day events in communities across Alberta to showcase work by the finalists and recipients. Emerald Days include environmental booths, a speakers series featuring awards recipients and finalists well as activities for kids and an environmentally friendly family movie. AEF’s Youth Environmental Engagement Grant Program inspires “the next generation of eco-heroes” by giving up to 100 young people micro-grants of up to $400 for environmental projects across the province.

“I’m proud to be a part of this 25th annual celebration as we celebrate and showcase some pretty extraordinary achievements made by individuals and organizations, all of who are dedicated to protecting, preserving, enhancing and sustaining the environment,” says Boyko. “We know that Albertans are passionate about the environment and we are honoured to share new and innovated environmental research, technology and practices.”

AREF is happy to support the Emerald Awards’ Shared Footprint category to celebrate projects that go beyond normal land management to have a positive impact on the environment. “Recipients of the Shared Footprints Award go above and beyond land and water stewardship, building and shared knowledge, improving air quality and reducing land disturbances,” says Boyko. “AREF’s support with this category has been invaluable.”

The Emerald Awards are unique in Canada and helps bring governments, private industry, non-government organizations and individuals together in support of the environment. This year, 70 people and/or organizations were nominated for an award and there will be 32 finalists announced, across 12 categories. The Emerald Awards will be held June 8 at TELUS Spark in Calgary.

The Alberta Water Nexus Simulation

The Alberta WaterPortal, through sponsorship from the Alberta Real Estate Foundation, Enbridge, and Veolia, developed case studies, an interactive simulation, and Sankey diagram for users to explore the implications of the convergence of demands for water in the Bow River Basin. Known as the Nexus, this concept highlights the interconnectedness of water for food, energy, and communities.

A first in Alberta, the Alberta Nexus Project analyzed strategic plans as well as existing watershed and industry data within the Bow River Basin to create an interactive simulation that shows the influence of future water demand on overall water management and availability on a regional basis. Users can try their hand at water management to see how well they can manage the converging demands of water, in addition to population growth and climatic change, in 2030.

Regardless of where it is applied, the Nexus Concept is complex and shows the intricate nature of water management. As populations grow, the Nexus Concept and approach to decision-making will result in a more holistic water management process and help us to address the risk of resource scarcity.

See if you can manage water needs across the Bow River Basin in 2030:  http://www.albertawater.com/nexus-simulation

After the fire for landlords and tenants in Alberta

The Fort McMurray wildfire affects many people, including landlords and tenants. You may have questions about what the wildfire means for your renting situation.

For more information, read the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta’s “After the fire for landlords and tenants in Alberta“.

New Energy Efficiency Agency Coming to Alberta

The recent announcement of a new energy efficiency agency for Alberta is good news for the real estate sector as energy efficiency programs have a proven track record of helping consumers save money and increasing the value of real estate.

In fact, energy efficiency programs currently exist in every province in Canada and state in the U.S. except Alberta. This was discovered as part of research undertaken by the Alberta Energy Efficiency Alliance (AEEA), a grantee of the Alberta Real Estate Foundation.

“Energy efficiency programs have been saving consumers money since the 1970s,” sums up Jesse Row, Executive Director of the AEEA. “In Alberta, we’ve been funding energy efficiency programs just when there’s a government surplus, but the opposite approach is taken just about everywhere else.”

Research conducted by the AEEA has identified that most energy efficiency programs in Canada and the U.S. are funded every month through a modest charge on utility bills. The funds are then used to help households and businesses reduce their energy consumption and save three to four times more money than they cost.

“Most energy efficiency programs need to report publicly to an energy regulator to make sure they’re making good use of consumer dollars,” adds Row. “Not only have programs demonstrated a suitable return on investment for consumers over the years, provinces and states have increased their funding as they’ve seen that energy efficiency is the cheapest way to meet increasing energy demand.”

More recently, energy efficiency programs have also been used to stimulate the economy and create jobs during economic downturns. During the last recession and recovery in the U.S., numbers compiled by the AEEA show that funding for energy efficiency programs went from US$3 billion in 2007 to US$8 billion in 2011. This funding increase happened at both the state level and through the U.S. federal government (mainly though the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act). Not only did energy efficiency programming in the U.S. increase during their last recession, it has maintained this level of funding as states continue to see a strong return on these investments.

For the real estate sector, the launch of an energy efficiency agency in Alberta creates opportunities to deliver more value-added services to clients. Energy efficiency programs in other provinces and states are very popular with households and businesses. These programs typically provide direct support for consumers, including financial incentives, to save energy through a combination of behaviour changes and physical upgrades to properties. The real estate sector is ideally positioned to help consumers take advantage of these new programs.

Once these programs are in place, the benefits to Alberta’s real estate sector are significant. A recent study commissioned by the AEEA shows that even an average-sized energy efficiency program for Alberta has the potential to result in over $200 million in additional energy efficiency upgrades to homes and buildings in the province each year. These investments lead directly to increased property values and over $500 million in annual energy bill savings for consumers. These savings can then be reinvested into other parts of the economy and create additional economic benefits for the province.

Keep up to date on the latest energy efficiency developments in Alberta through the Alberta Energy Efficiency Alliance (LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook) or by signing up for an AEEA membership.

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Energy Poverty in Alberta

A surprising number of Albertans are being left out in the cold… inside their own homes.

They are the energy poor, those hard pressed to pay their utility bills. Living in cold, damp homes impacts their health and well being, especially the elderly, young, disabled and those with long-term illnesses. Needless to say, they can ill afford the energy-efficiency measures that would improve their lives and benefit the environment.

About 455,000 Albertans live in energy poverty. These low-income families spend three times more disposable income on home energy—heating, cooking and lighting—than the average household. For the poorest, it’s more than 9 per cent of their after-tax income.

The energy poor must often make difficult choices between competing necessities such as energy, water, food and clothing. The most dramatic choice for some is to “heat or eat.” Indeed, evidence suggests the poorest households, especially among seniors, spend less on food in winter to pay for additional heating.

Living in cold homes can contribute to heart disease, reduced lung function, suppressed immune systems, asthma attacks and exacerbated arthritis. It is also associated with increased stress, social isolation and, for children, impaired educational success.

Energy poverty thus results in increased public costs for health care and social services. One study suggests that every $1 spent on raising living temperatures to acceptable standards saves 42 cents in health-care costs.

Alberta’s energy poor could also be disproportionately impacted by any changes to the provincial government’s climate-change policies. Such changes will likely lead to increased energy prices, hurting poorer households, which ironically emit fewer greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions than the norm.

The most cost-effective, sustainable solution to this problem is to increase the energy efficiency of energy-poor households, starting with those most in need. Realistically, this can only happen with substantial subsidies.

Many jurisdictions in Canada and the U.S. operate and fund energy efficiency and conservation programs for low-income households. In Calgary, All One Sky Foundation has for several years operated a demonstration Energy Angel program, which provides energy-efficiency upgrades to the homes of low-income seniors.

But this is just a start for what needs to be a much more widespread effort. Tackling energy poverty in Alberta offers a potential win-win-win for three important environmental and social policy agendas: climate-change mitigation and greenhouse gas reduction; health and well-being; and poverty alleviation.

Read All One Sky Foundation’s “Energy Poverty – An Agenda for Alberta” report here.

All-One-Sky-Foundation

 

 

*Image: Helen Corbett, Executive Director of the All One Sky Foundation with Alberta Real Estate Foundation Past Chair Gary Willson.

 

The Alberta Emerald Foundation Announces 25th Annual Emerald Awards Finalists

Today, at Calgary’s Eau Claire Market, hopeful nominees joined the Alberta Emerald Foundation (AEF), its sponsors, volunteers and other members from the local community, for the announcement of the 25th Annual Emerald Awards Finalists.

Over the past weeks, a panel of knowledgeable third-party judges with cross-sectoral experience rose to the challenge of narrowing down the brilliant examples of innovation and environmental achievement nominated this year for the uniquely-Albertan award. A maximum of three nominees in each of the ten Emerald Award categories have been selected as a finalist. Only one per category will take home the award.

“The Alberta Emerald Foundation is at the forefront of celebrating great achievements in sustainable development, bringing awareness to the many unique environmental projects occurring throughout Alberta,” says Aaron Dublenko, past Emerald Award recipient and member of the current judging panel. “Whether it’s schools, industry, government, non-governmental agencies, large or small companies, anyone can be acknowledged for their ingenuity in sustainable practices. Such recognition reminds us that despite the many pressures our air, water and soil face, people are working tirelessly to use less, reduce their footprints and educate others on how to do the same.”

“We are the only Foundation in the country to recognize the important work of environmental leaders across all sectors,” says Andy Etmanski, Chair of the Board, AEF. “By honouring and elevating the ingenuity, dedication and hard work of these individuals and organizations, we inspire others to follow their example, benefiting all Albertans with a healthier and cleaner environment.”

The Emerald Awards recognize and celebrate environmental excellence achieved by individuals, not-for-profit associations, large and small corporations, community groups and governments from across Alberta. Since 1992, the Emerald Awards has recognized over 475 finalists and 280 recipients who have demonstrated creative thinking and innovation in environmental management systems, technologies and education programs.

The 25th Annual Emerald Awards will be presented on June 8, 2016 at Telus Spark in Calgary.

Congratulations to ALUS in Alberta and Beaver Hills Initiative for being named finalists in the Shared Footprint category!

To read the full list of finalists, visit the Alberta Emerald Foundation’s website here.

AREF Announces Support of the Energy Futures Lab

The Board of Governors of the Alberta Real Estate Foundation (AREF) approved a grant of $250,000 to foster community engagement with a focus on energy literacy across Alberta through the Energy Futures Lab. This is a bold commitment by AREF toward co-creating the province’s energy future as part of the Foundation’s 25th anniversary.

“This is an important conversation to have in the province and it affects all Albertans.” Charlie Ponde, Chair of the AREF Board of Governors states. “The Board is pleased that the Energy Futures Lab is representing a microcosm of Alberta as a whole by engaging industry, government, academia, non-for-profit and First Nations to achieve a robust and constructive conversation.”

Cheryl De Paoli, AREF’s Executive Director, and an EFL Steering Committee Member for the past year, adds, “We want people to really understand where their energy comes from, and to understand what it means to talk about renewables and innovation. We have to get beyond an “Us vs. Them” argument and a commitment to energy literacy is going to be a big part of getting us there.”

AREF’s funding is to support the Energy Futures Lab’s public engagement commitment to share more broadly EFL Fellowship discussions, prototyping and new innovations with communities across Alberta.

“Our grant to the Energy Futures Lab is AREF’s commitment to Alberta’s innovative spirit.” Cheryl De Paoli states, “We have a history of incredible ingenuity in getting oil and gas out of the ground and to market. And this spirit will be critical in setting ourselves on a path to move beyond oil and gas, and to position Alberta as a global energy leader now and into the future.”

One of the major opportunities to engage Albertans in shaping their energy future is the Newtonian Shift game which is an immersive simulation game that condenses 20 years of energy transition into a single day. Players take on one of a variety of roles within an outdated and inefficient energy system and collaborate in order to create the energy system of the future or risk being left behind. Over the coming year, a series of game sessions will be hosted in communities across Alberta. The first two of these will be held in Calgary on Thursday, April 7 and Edmonton on Thursday, April 14.

Read the full announcement on the Energy Futures Lab here.

The grant is made under the AREF’s new Community Innovation funding stream which supports projects, practices and ideas that encourage experimentation with the goal of creating new ways of realizing community potential and character within Alberta.

Board Chair named REALTOR® of the Year

We are delighted to announce that Alberta Real Estate Foundation Board Chair, Charlie Ponde, was named REALTOR® of the Year at the REALTORS® Association of Edmonton’s gala dinner on March 4th, 2016.

Charlie has been an active and full-time member of the REALTORS® Association of Edmonton ever since he entered the real estate profession in 1992. Charlie was elected and served as the President of the REALTORS® Association of Edmonton in 2000. He has served on numerous committees relating to real estate including AREX Claims Committee, the Edmonton Realtors’ Charitable Foundation (Governor and President), the Arbitration and Professional Standards Committee, the Technology Committee and the Government and Political Action Committee.

Charlie is also an active member of the community. His involvement includes the Affordable Housing Committee, Sign of Hope Campaign – Catholic Social Services, The Christmas Bureau, Realty Watch and the Neighborhood Watch Programs, St. Albert Lottery Board, St. Albert’s City Plan 2000 Advisory Committee (Municipal Development Plan), the Edmonton Immigrant Services Association and is a Director with CARP, a seniors national advocacy organization.

Charlie was named Chair of the Alberta Real Estate Foundation Board on January 1, 2016.

On behalf of the Board of Governors and staff of the Alberta Real Estate Foundation, we would like to offer our sincere congratulations to Charlie on this achievement. Thank you for your dedication to the industry and the community!

Read the REALTORS® Association of Edmonton announcement here.

 

March 2016 Community Investment

The Board of Governors of the Alberta Real Estate Foundation approved $445,000 in community investment projects at their recent meeting.

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation (AREF) supports initiatives that enhance the real estate industry and benefit the communities of Alberta. AREF was set up in 1991 under the Alberta Real Estate Act. Since then, it has awarded approximately 17 million dollars in community and industry grants to over 550 projects across Alberta.

AREF is currently celebrating its 25th Anniversary of making a difference in Alberta. To celebrate we launched a new area of interest call Community Innovation and will be highlighting past grantees. Keep in touch with AREF through our website or on Twitter (@arefabca) to ensure you do not miss out on what is to come!

Projects approved at the March meeting include:

Accessible Housing Accessible U

Accessible U is an information hub about accessibility, especially in residential environments. Meeting information needs for Albertans experiencing mobility barriers, Accessible U is committed to making relevant, understandable information readily available to everyone. We’re creating a space to inform and empower people, creating a more accessible Alberta.

Alberta Rural Development Network (ARDN) ARDN Sustainable Housing Initiative

There is an acute shortage of affordable housing in many rural Alberta communities. ARDN will work with several rural communities to start addressing this issue by conducting affordable housing needs assessments and feasibility studies in a coordinated and cost effective manner, and create and share a model of best practices.

Alternative Land Use Services (ALUS) Communications and Outreach for the ALUS Alberta Municipal Alliance (AAMA)

The AAMA is made up of ten ALUS communities, led by ALUS in partnership with municipalities. These programs are changing private land and conservation dynamics in several ways: they incentivize conservation activities on agricultural land by paying for ecosystem services; they build ownership over conservation and community support (each community forms a Partnership Advisory Committee made up of farmers, municipal officials, realtors, watershed based conservation groups, etc.); and they achieve measurable, verified conservation.

Capital Region Housing Foundation (HOME Program) MOVE Forward

The MOVE Forward Program encompasses education, counselling and advocacy, and referral to service providers to assist and support individuals to become successful, stable tenants/renters. Program components include 12 hours of in-class education deigned to create a personalized plan for stable housing; improve an individual’s communication skills, and create a workable household budget that makes rent a priority. The core of the program is the education component of six 120 minute sessions delivered by a team of specialized facilitators and community experts.

Centre for Affordable Water and Sanitation Technology (CAWST) Alberta Water Issues CAWST Capacity Building Workshop Package

CAWST is bringing its model for adult water education home to Alberta. With local partners, we will co-develop and pilot 3-5 lesson plans that introduce members of corporate groups and community organizations to water and sanitation issues, building their capacity to protect Alberta’s resources and share this knowledge.

The Natural Step Energy Futures Lab

The Energy Futures Lab (EFL) is an Alberta-based collaboration for tackling the interconnected issues of climate change, energy security, and sustainable development today in order to build the foundation for Alberta’s future prosperity. The convening question for the EFL is: How can Alberta’s leadership position in today’s energy system serve as a platform for the transition to the energy system that the future requires of us? We are requesting funding to develop and implement the public engagement stream of the EFL, which will use a community innovation approach to engage more than 100,000 Albertans, including real estate stakeholders, in dialogue, learning and action about energy transition in the province.

The Pembina Institute Renewable Best Practices

Over the next 15 years, wind capacity in Alberta will roughly quadruple, with the provincial goal of 30% renewable electricity by 2030. While wind is a cleaner source of electricity, some residents have concerns about the impact on vistas, property values, and local and migratory species. These concerns are best mitigated proactively by adhering to best practices for wind development. The purpose of this project is to highlight best practices that empower and benefit stakeholders as well as minimize the impact on the ecosystem, and to build a framework that will enable  development of responsible and socially acceptable wind projects in Alberta.

The University of Lethbridge Challenges and Solutions in Acquiring Water for Housing Development

Housing development is a $10 billion industry in Alberta. However, it may be curtailed by lack of water needed to service new residential communities. This study explores the challenges and solutions to acquiring water for housing development and the secondary impact a decline in the industry could have on the real estate market.

Community Energy Plans drive economic development, cut energy costs, reduce emissions and create jobs

The Foundation is involved in the Community Energy Planning Getting to Implementation in Canada (GTI) Initiative. GTI is a multi-year national initiative that is empowering communities to take a leading role on energy, including innovative energy projects such as renewable electricity, district energy, biomass, landfill gas capture, clean transportation, electric vehicles and others.

On February 10th, GTI released a new research report Community Energy Planning: The Value Proposition prepared by Sustainable Prosperity. The report states that Canadian communities have untapped opportunities to strengthen local economies, reduce current and future energy costs and emissions, and create jobs by investing in smarter and more integrated approaches to energy use at the local level. In addition, community energy planning has a positive effect on environmental and community health goals, as well as economic ones.

To read the full report please visit: www.gettingtoimplementation.ca/research

Edmonton Library Users Can Test Home Energy Consumption

Homeowners are now able to perform an informal energy audit of their home with Green HomeEnergy Toolkits available from Edmonton Public Libraries. A grant from the Alberta Real Estate Foundation (AREF) to the City of Edmonton helped make the kits available.

Each kit is self-contained in a sturdy case and includes a digital thermometer, power meters, instructional booklets, and other tools to help homeowners examine their utility consumption. Once the excess uses of power, heat, or water are found, homeowners can reduce the waste and save on the cost of utilities.

Charlie Ponde, AREF chair, joined Edmonton City Councillor Michael Walters and the Manager of Collections, Management and Access Division, Edmonton Public Library, Sharon Karr, on January 14 to announce the kits’ availability.

“For the last 25 years, our foundation has strived to support initiatives that make a real difference in the industry and in the lives of Albertans,” said Ponde. “By taking the initiative on energy efficiency, the City of Edmonton is a model for many other municipalities across the province.”

There is no cost to borrow a kit. The kits can be ordered and checked out of any Edmonton Public Library branch like books or records and kept for up to three weeks. There is already a backlog of several hundred requests for the kits. The City of Edmonton has also placed kits with the two school boards for use by students and has kits available for promotional purposes at trade shows and exhibits.

Similar kits are available in other communities in Alberta (Red Deer) and the interest in Edmonton is spurring other municipalities (St. Albert and Okotoks) and library systems to acquire their own kits.

The low-down on condos in Alberta

CREB®Now sat down with Amelia Martin, executive director for the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta, to get answers on everything from how to review a condo board’s documents to knowing your rights as an investor.

CPLEA recently unveiled a new resource (www.condolawalberta.ca) funded by the Alberta Real Estate Foundation to help Albertans thinking about buying a condo, currently living in one, or considering selling or renting their condo.

Click here to read the full interview on CREB®Now’s website.

Foundation introduces Governor Doug Leighton

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation (AREF) is pleased to formally announce that Doug Leighton has joined our Board of Governors for a three year term.

Prior to becoming involved with AREF, Doug was aware of the positive effects of AREF’s counterpart in BC: “I served on the Planning Institute of BC and we co-sponsored a successful bi-annual ‘Land Summit’ with the Real Estate Foundation of BC.”

As a result, when he arrived in Alberta, Doug was quick to become involved with AREF. He is pleased to join AREF’s Board of Governors as his personal and professional interests are highly aligned with the Foundation’s values and objectives.

Doug is one of the three Public Appointments sitting on the Board of Governors and  hopes to contribute his experience in the private and public sectors. He has a strong background in housing, urban design and sustainable development as well as connections with the land development and housing industries.

“I think that communication and collaboration between all the players involved in real estate, land and housing is critical,” Doug says. “I feel privileged to join the AREF Board and to help advance its mandate to the benefit of Albertans.”

….

Doug is Vice President, Sustainability for Brookfield Residential Properties, a leading North American homebuilding and land development company. A proponent of good planning and urban design, he has more than 30 years international experience as a professional planner and architect in the public and private sectors.

A graduate of the University of Calgary (BA Geography and Masters Environmental Design), Doug initially worked as an architect and planner in Calgary and Vancouver. He moved to the public sector as Senior Planner for the Resort Municipality of Whistler. He was founding Director of Planning and Development for the Town of Banff, where he led the Downtown Enhancement Project and helped establish the Banff Housing and Heritage Corporations.

In 1997 Doug moved to New Zealand and became principal of a leading consultancy. He helped develop the NZ Urban Design Protocol and advised clients as diverse as Housing New Zealand, Waterfront Auckland and Shania Twain.

Doug returned to Canada in 2008 to represent Carma Developers (now Brookfield Residential) on Vancouver Island; and finally ‘came home’ to Calgary in 2012.

Doug has served as a Director of the Alberta, New Zealand and British Columbia Planning Institutes. He currently serves on the Board of ULI Calgary and was appointed to the Board of Governors of the Alberta Real Estate Foundation in November, 2015.

Foundation introduces Chair Charlie Ponde

As of January 1st 2016, Charlie Ponde became the Alberta Real Estate Foundation’s 13th Chair of the Board of Governors.

Charlie was appointed to Alberta Real Estate Foundation Board of Governors in 2012 by the Alberta Real Estate Association (AREA). Prior to joining the Board, Charlie had always followed and observed past Governors and the actions of Alberta Real Estate Foundation. “I admired the way AREF was quietly making an impact by funding numerous projects in the province,” Charlie said, “I always wanted to get involved and be part of the work AREF was doing.”

Charlie Ponde was born in India and completed his university education in the city of Mumbai. Charlie immigrated to Canada 48 years ago. After working in the dental field, Charlie entered the real estate profession in 1992, to fulfil a passion for buying and selling real estate and for working with people. Charlie has been an active and full-time member of the REALTORS® Association of Edmonton ever since.

Charlie was elected and served as the President of the REALTORS® Association of Edmonton in 2009 and now is a Life Member of the Association. He served on numerous committees relating to real estate including AREX Claims Committee, the Edmonton Realtors’ Charitable Foundation (Governor and President), the Arbitration and Professional Standards Committee, the Technology Committee and the Government and Political Action Committee.

An active member of the community, Charlie has been involved with the Affordable Housing Committee, Sign of Hope Campaign – Catholic Social Services, The Christmas Bureau, Realty Watch and the Neighborhood Watch Programs, St. Albert Lottery Board, St. Albert’s City Plan 2000 Advisory Committee (Municipal Development Plan), the Edmonton Immigrant Services Association and is a Director with CARP, a seniors national advocacy organization.

Charlie’s first priority in taking on the role of Chair is to ensure there is effective communication between the Board of Governors, staff and AREF’s stakeholders. “I may be the Chair but I feel it is a team effort. In order for AREF to be effective, the Board and staff must be on the same page, working to enhance the Real Estate industry and make a difference in Alberta together.”

The Foundation would like to express their deepest gratitude to Gary Willson who will be stepping into the role as Past-Chair. His leadership and experience in planning, industry and community engagement has enhance the Foundations profile and helped increase its reach throughout the province through collaboration with industry and communities.

Charlie will serve a two year term as Chair of the Board. His experience in the industry, insight on community initiatives and remarkable networking skills will bring much value to the Foundation.

AREF supports Habitat for Humanity Home at Neufeld Landing

On December 17th, nine families received keys to their Habitat for Humanity Home at Neufeld Landing, the largest Habitat Build in Canadian history.

For the last 25 years, the Foundation has strived to support initiatives that make a difference in the industry and in the lives of Albertans. As such, we are proud to be a partner on the Habitat for Humanity Home at Neufeld Landing and support the vital work of Habitat for Humanity Edmonton.

When presenting at the dedication ceremony, Chair Elect Charlie Ponde said, “The Alberta Real Estate Foundation would like to thank the REALTORS Community Foundation for funding this project and partnering with us on this build. This is the fourth partnership build we have been involved in with the REALTORS Community Foundation and we look forward to investing in future meaningful projects with them.”

Congratulations to the nine families on their new home and all of the memories that it will soon house.

For a short video of the Neufeld Landing Home Dedication Ceremony please see below:

October 2015 Community Investment

The Board of Governors of the Alberta Real Estate Foundation approved $353,500 in community investment projects at their recent meeting.

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation (AREF) supports initiatives that enhance the real estate industry and benefit the communities of Alberta. AREF was set up in 1991 under the Alberta Real Estate Act. Since then, it has awarded approximately 17 million dollars in community and industry grants to over 550 projects across Alberta. Next year, AREF will be celebrating its 25th anniversary of making a difference in Alberta. We are excited to be launching a new area of interest and highlighting past grantees. Keep in touch with AREF through our website or on Twitter (@arefabca) to ensure you do not miss out on what is to come!

Projects approved at the October meeting include:

University of Alberta – Alberta School of Business Real Estate Program Practice of Commercial Real Estate Program

The Real Estate Program at the Alberta School of Business in collaboration with the Faculty of Extension proposes to develop the curriculum defined by RECA in a document entitled ‘Practice of Commercial Real Estate’ or PCRE dated October 31, 2013. RECA (the Real Estate Council of Alberta) currently offers the Fundamental of Real Estate which is a prerequisite for taking commercial pre-licensing courses which were offered through AREA (Alberta Real Estate Association). RECA is seeking to develop course materials for a more intensive college or university level course for Commercial Real Estate Pre-licensing.

Southwest Alberta Sustainable Community Initiative (SASCI) Pincher Creek RCADE (Regional Centres for Arts, Design & Entrepreneurship)

RCADE is a community based development that operates on two levels. On a local level, it is a community based enterprise that supports learning, innovation, and creativity. On a regional level, it is a way to direct resources and expertise to develop shared use resources, best use practices, and a regional approach to economic development. Learning-focused institutions and organizations in the town of Pincher Creek will collaborate to design Pincher Creek RCADE (Regional Centres for Arts, Design & Entrepreneurship), a sustainable and scalable system for building community capacity for learning, creativity and innovation. RCADE is pronounced ‘arcade’. Design objectives are to support communities in southwest Alberta in developing innovation and entrepreneurship as core competencies, and to support residents in fulfilling their creative potential. The project will involve the public schools (K-6, 7-12); private school (K-12); municipal library; Aboriginal friendship centre; Allied Arts Council; Adult Learning Council; and post-secondary institutions including Lethbridge College and the Alberta College of Art & Design (ACAD).

Arts Habitat Edmonton Edmonton SpaceFinder

Edmontonspacefinder.ca, launched in 2010, is an online resource, to post or find, non-profit and community space; to assist renters find venues and venues to find their renters. Challenges with the original proprietary programming language make alterations or improvements to the current Edmonton SpaceFinder difficult and ultimately not possible. New York-based Fractured Atlas has the desired platform to replace the existing Edmonton SpaceFinder that is now out of date in its capabilities.

University of Calgary, Faculty of Environmental Design Senior Research Studio on Aging-in-Place Laneway Housing

This project will look at options for aging-in-place in laneway homes and secondary suites. It is being conducted in the context of a senior graduate level architecture research studio in the Faculty of Environmental Design, University of Calgary. 10-14 concept designs will be developed in conjunction with industry and diverse academia to demonstrate how secondary suites and options for aging-in-place can fit into our existing neighborhoods.

Alberta WaterPortal Society  A Sustainable Water Supply for Alberta: Managing the Water-Energy-Food Nexus

This project will research and define the scope of the Nexus issue and use water valuation principles to develop an Alberta-specific, publicly available water valuation tool and a guidance document for using the tool.

St. Albert Housing Society HOMEstyle Benefit Breakfast

The HOMEstyle Breakfast is the Housing Society’s signature event set to educate about the critical need and societal benefits of affordable housing in building communities. The event is also a fundraiser, although considered the secondary purpose. Avi Friedman, an international expert in innovative housing and urban design is the speaker.

Edmonton Public Library Forward Thinking Speakers Event – Building Better Communities

The Edmonton Public Library, with its extensive and diverse reach, is in the unique position to bring together community members to share insights, ideas, experiences and viewpoints through our Forward Thinking Speakers Series. With the support of AREF, we would like to present a speaker to our community in 2016, with a focus on building better communities and a goal of engaging more Edmontonians in this concept.

Foundation travels to Southern Alberta

On August 10th, AREF Staff and members of the Board of Governors travelled to Lethbridge to meet with potential partners in the area. While there, we learned a great deal about the strengths and opportunities in Southern Alberta including some of the research occurring at the University of Lethbridge with respect to Alberta climate change and its effects on agriculture and on the effects of communities on watersheds and land use. We also discussed the challenges and possible solutions Lethbridge faces with population retention, and how skills in the arts and entrepreneurship together with technology offer unique possibilities for rural communities.

AREF also stopped by the Helen Schuler Nature Centre to tour the remarkable facility and to see the Prairie Roof, an intensive living roof to which AREF granted funding for in 2013. The roof features a stunning display of rugged and well adapted grassland plants. Should you find yourself in the Lethbridge area, we strongly encourage dropping by the Helen Schuler Nature Centre to learn more of what nature can teach us about ourselves and how to build and live more sustainably.

Thank you to all of those who met with AREF Staff and Board for their hospitality. While AREF has strong and important partnerships in the Calgary and Edmonton areas, we hope to engage more with other communities and organizations throughout Alberta.

For more information on the Helen Schuler Nature Centre

For more information on the University of Lethbridge

For more information on the City of Lethbridge

 

Foundation seeks new Public Board Member

The Foundation is seeking a candidate to fill the position of Public Appointment (Business) on the Board of Governors.

As a Governor you will:

  •  – Participate in three meetings a year;
  •  – Contribute to the strategic direction of the Foundation;
  •  – Decide upon community investment grant funding;
  •  – Contribute to a dynamic learning board and organization;
  •  – Develop and grow your skills and provide leadership to projects in Alberta.

According to the Ministerial Regulations, the Foundation is seeking one person, who is not in the industry, who is appointed by the current members of the board then in office and is, in the opinion of those members, representative of Alberta businesses.

Preference will be given to a candidate who brings the following:

  •  Understanding of Alberta’s economy, housing choices, industry and community innovation.
  •  Governance and previous Board experience including financial and investment responsibilities.
  •  Awareness of good grantmaking and community investment practices.
  •  Is not a practising member of the real estate industry (does not hold a real estate licence).

For more information, please view the complete description here or contact Executive Director, Cheryl De Paoli, at 403.228.4786 or cdepaoli@aref.ab.ca (Indicate in the subject line: Board Public Appointment).

All applications are due by September 25st, 2015.

Announcement of new Executive Director of the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta (CPLEA)

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation is pleased to announce that Ms. Amelia Martin has been appointed as the Executive Director of the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta (CPLEA).

Ms. Martin joined CPLEA in January 2015 as the public legal education lawyer after leaving private practice in Calgary. While obtaining her law degree at the University of Ottawa, she was selected to be one of the Dean’s Legal Research and Writing Fellows and was involved in teaching the legal research and writing class. As a caseworker at the University’s Community Legal Clinic, she assisted vulnerable clients who were experiencing housing issues or facing criminal charges. She also worked closely with the Centre for Equality Rights in Accommodation and contributed to a report for the United Nations titled Forced Evictions: Global Crisis, Global Solutions.

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation has been a proud supporter of CPLEA for 15 years and are looking forward to working with Ms. Martin in her role as Executive Director.

The CPLEA’s mission is to enhance the accessibility and quality of justice realized in Canada. It addresses its mission by creating learning opportunities and building learning communities that facilitate the creation, management, exchange, and integration of knowledge among people within the justice system and between them and the general public.

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation is currently providing funding to CPLEA’s Condo Law for Albertans project which you can learn more about on our website: Phase One and Phase Two

Unlocking the door to Smart Energy Communities – a Framework for Implementation

Communities – the places where we live, work and play – account for 60% of energy use in Canada, as well as over half of all greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs). In other words, when we invest, plan and implement effectively for Smart Energy Communities, we can have a direct impact on addressing Canada’s energy and GHG challenges.

QUEST believes that there are three fundamental features of a Smart Energy Community that you can view by watching this video.

  • First, a Smart Energy Community integrates conventional energy networks. That means that the electricity, natural gas, district energy and transportation fuel networks in a community are better coordinated to match energy needs with the most efficient energy source.
  • Second, a Smart Energy Community integrates land use, recognizing that poor land use can equal a whole lot of energy waste.
  • Third, a Smart Energy Community harnesses local energy opportunities.

Many cities and communities in Canada have taken ownership over their energy, recognizing the significant impact energy has on the local economy, health and community resilience. These communities are exemplifying some of the features of a Smart Energy Community.

Consider Surrey, British Columbia, where the municipal government is building a district energy system that will efficiently provide heating and cooling to buildings in the City Centre. Surrey is also developing the largest Organic Biofuels facility in Canada which will turn organic waste into renewable natural gas that will replace diesel and gasoline fueling for municipal vehicle fleets.

Consider also Yellowknife, Northwest Territories, which successfully completed a 10-year community energy plan and exceeded greenhouse gas emission reduction targets by 100%, in part by converting from oil to renewable wood-pellet burning heating systems throughout the city.

And finally, consider Guelph, Ontario where the municipal government and electric utility have collaborated to develop the Galt District Energy system, seven solar energy facilities, a small-scale combined heat and power system, and plans for both a large-scale combined heat and power facility and biomass projects. Guelph is also playing host to net-zero residential developments.

These and many other communities are blazing trails – led in particular by the initiative and leadership of the municipal and provincial governments, gas and electric utilities, and real estate stakeholders that make them up.

Though there is no one-size-fits-all approach to becoming a Smart Energy Community, Surrey, Yellowknife and Guelph each use a Community Energy Plan to guide decision making around energy.  Lessons learned in these communities can be applied in every community across Canada.

A Community Energy Plan is a tool that helps communities define priorities around energy with a view to improving efficiency, cutting emissions and driving economic development. Community Energy Plans are an important and effective enabler for becoming a Smart Energy Community.

Community Energy Planning: Getting to Implementation in Canada

That is why QUEST has partnered with The Community Energy Association and Sustainable Prosperity, Canada’s leading community energy experts, to launch a national initiative entitled Community Energy Planning: Getting to Implementation in Canada. The objective of this multiyear initiative is to build the capacity of Canadian communities to develop and implement Community Energy Plans. This will be done through the development of a Community Energy Implementation Framework.

Over the next year, the project will be drawing on lessons learned from communities across Canada through research, as well as a series of national workshops, to develop the Implementation Framework.  The Framework will help communities navigate the challenges faced when it comes to implementing Community Energy Plans and will provide them with the tools they need to become Smart Energy Communities.

QUEST recognizes that every community will have its own unique set of opportunities and challenges for advancing Smart Energy Communities. The solutions will vary from community to community. The Getting to Implementation initiative is one of the first steps for identifying the success factors and barriers for CEP implementation. Understanding these will bring QUEST one step closer to defining how other communities across Canada can develop and implement Community Energy Plans effectively, and become Smart Energy Communities.

Be sure to attend Community Energy Planning: Getting to Implementation in Alberta on June 18th 9:30 am – 3:30 pm at the University of Alberta. Register here.

By: Eric Campbell, Acting Director, Programs & Service, QUEST and Sarah Marchionda, Manager, Research & Education, QUEST

Alberta Green Condo Guide: Saving money and helping the environment

The Green Condo Guide for Alberta outlines how to capitalize on energy saving opportunities in common areas of a condominium, including centralized heating, cooling and ventilation systems and lighting.

Reducing a building’s energy bills is a huge opportunity to save money and reduce a building’s impact on the environment.   In fact, at least 40 per cent of a condominium building’s operating costs go to gas, electricity and water bills, making utilities the largest controllable expense for any condo corporation.

And most older condos can cut these costs by 30 per cent by doing a few upgrades, adding more efficient lighting or boilers.  Even a newer building can realize savings of at least 15 per cent.

This simple to follow and easy to read 14-page guide outlines a number of steps that will not only reduce a condo’s energy use—saving money and reducing emissions—it will result in a more comfortable and well maintained building.

The step-by-step overview of how you can green a condo begins with information on how to baseline and benchmark a building’s energy use, perform an energy audit and set goals.  Next, it goes through a high level explanation of how to identify opportunities for improvement, assess the business case for upgrades and improvements and develop and track a retrofit plan.

A good energy retrofit will help protect the capital that’s invested in a condo by ensuring the building’s systems are in good operational order and operating costs are under control. A green building is comfortable and cost-efficient, which protects an owner’s investment and is more attractive to buyers.

The Green Condo Guide for Alberta, funded in part with a grant from AREF, is based on work originated by the Toronto Atmospheric Fund (TAF) and adapted for Alberta by the Pembina Institute.

The Foundation announces spring community investment recipients

The Board of Governors of the Alberta Real Estate Foundation recently approved $267,500 in community investment projects at their recent meeting on March 21st, 2014. 

Of the 4 projects funded in March we are delighted to include:

$150,000 for the Alberta Emerald Foundation to fund the shared footprints land use category for the Alberta Emerald Awards over 3 years.

$12,500 to the Battle River Watershed Alliance Society for their “Traversing Terrain and Experience: The Atlas and Educator’s Guide.”

$90,000 to the Center for Public Legal Education for phase one of consumer condominium education in Alberta.

$15,000 to Wildsight, in collaboration with Living Lakes Canada, for their “Lac La Biche Shoreline Stewardship Project.”

Gary Willson, Chair for the Foundation comments:
“We are very proud to be partnering with the Alberta Emerald Foundation for the shared foot prints award category, and we are looking forward supporting the finalists in recognizing their good work and impact on Alberta Communities.”

Cheryl De Paoli, Executive Director adds:
“Condominiums are a hot topic in Alberta, we are pleased to be support the Centre for Public Legal Education in Alberta to develop a great resource for Condo owners, boards and Real Estate Professionals.”

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation supports initiatives that enhance the Real Estate Industry and benefit the communities of Alberta. The Foundation was set up in 1991 under the Alberta Real Estate Act. Since then, it has awarded over 15.1 million dollars in community and industry grants to over 480 projects across Alberta.

The Foundation welcomes Krista Bolton and Jamal Ramjohn to the Board

In January of 2014 the Foundation has gained two new Governors.

Krista Bolton was appointed to the Foundation on behalf of the Real Estate Council of Alberta.

Krista is a Chartered Mediator with a practice focused on family mediation and specializing in the management of complex family issues.  Her education includes a Bachelor of Science Degree in Linguistics from the University of Victoria, certification in Conflict Management from the ADR Institute of Alberta, and ongoing education toward a certificate in Tribunal Administrative Justice. 

Krista currently serves on the Real Estate Council of Alberta as the public member appointed by council.  Some of her RECA committee work has included governance, hearings and finance and audit.  She also sits on hearings and appeal panels as a public member.

Read more about Krista here


Jamal Ramjohn was elected as a Public Appointee

Jamal has spent much of his land use planning career in the private sector, helping a diverse range of governmental, corporate, First Nation and development clients.  He holds a Bachelor of Design in Environmental Planning from the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design and Master of Design in Planning from the University of Calgary.  He is a Registered Professional Planner (Alberta), Member of the Canadian Institute of Planners and is presently a Senior Planner in New Community Planning at The City of Calgary.

Read more about Jamal here

The Foundation is pleased to welcome Krista and Jamal to the Board. Both new Governors will serve for 3 year terms.

2013 Annual Report now available

2013 Annual ReportThe Foundation has just released its 2013 Annual Report and Audited Financials.

Highlights include stories of our grantees and projects we have funded, as well as key events and milestones made by the Foundation.

This year we would like to say thank you to Jay Freeman who will moving into the role of Past Chair so that we may welcome Gary Willson as Chair 2014 and 2015.

Read and download our annual report here.

UNDERSTANDING SOLAR ENERGY IN ALBERTA

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation has recently partnered with The Northern Alberta Institute of Technology, The City of Edmonton and The City of Grande Prairie to advance the understanding of solar electric systems in Alberta. Through a $38,000 contribution the AREF made possible construction of a solar photovoltaic test bed atop Grande Prairie city hall. This test bed will operate in tandem with a City of Edmonton sponsored system installed at NAIT’s main campus.

 These solar reference arrays are designed to study the impact of snow and tilt angle on solar electric installations in Alberta’s rugged climate.

Project Overview

 Computer modeling tells us that Alberta has extraordinary solar electric potential. Big clear skies and cooler temperatures are the ideal environment for optimizing solar photovoltaic production. Although computer modeling is a necessary first step it requires some assumptions which can only be verified through real world testing. The solar reference arrays are the next step needed to understand system design and financial impacts of solar energy in Alberta.

 Reference Array Design

 The lower solar modules (panels) have been arranged in pairs at the most commonly found residential roof pitches. The fifth pair represents the latitude of the array location (55 degrees for GP, 53 degrees for Edmonton) and the sixth at 90 degrees to study the effects of wall mounting.

 To study the impact of snow the left-most module of each pair will be regularly cleared of all snow while the right side modules will be left to Mother Nature.

 NAIT’s Alternative Energy Program will be collecting and analyzing data from each module at five minute intervals for the full duration of the five year project.

Gary Willson becomes Chair for Foundation

As of January 1st 2014, Gary Willson will take the reins from Jay Freeman to become the Alberta Real Estate Foundation’s 12th Chair of the Board of Governors.

Gary Willson is Principal of GW Associates Planning Consultants Ltd. as well as a Senior Associate with Delaney and Associates.

During his thirty plus years of community and environmental planning, he has been involved with a variety of planning projects throughout Northern, Western and Central Canada. An understanding of what people value in their environments and why, and how this can be incorporated in the decisions we make, policies we develop and the physical projects we design and build, continues to be a common thread to his work.

Gary is an active member of the Canadian Institute of Planners, the Alberta Professional Planners Institute and a certified trainer with the International Association for Public Participation (IAP2). A Past President of the IAP2 International Board, he has also been actively involved with the Environmental Services Association of Alberta and the Alberta Association Canadian Institute of Planners.

Gary will serve a two year term as Chair of the Board. His experience in planning, industry and community and stakeholder engagement will bring much value and new ideas to the Foundation.

The Foundation would like to express their deepest gratitude to Jay Freeman who will be stepping into the role as Past-Chair. His leadership and vision has helped enhance the Foundations profile and reach throughout the Province.

Conservation Caravan film now online

Check out the Conservation Caravan film, now available online at grasslandcommunity.org.

The Conservation Caravan highlights the “real life” on the prairie as it pertains to stewardship in ranching. Not often do urban consumers think about how grazers can be used as a tool to enhance biodiversity, maintain landscape health, care for wildlife, and help support a functioning prairie ecosystem. However, this stewardship isn’t “free” to implement and therefore needs our support.
Operation Grassland Community has been working with ranchers in Alberta’s Grassland Natural Region for over twenty years; we want to share this story to help bridge the communication gap between producers and the consumers of their product. The Conservation Caravan is just the beginning of what we hope will be an on-going conservation.

FOUNDATION SEEKS NEW PUBLIC BOARD MEMBER

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation is seeking a candidate to fill the position of Public Appointment (Special Skills). According to the Ministerial Regulations, the Foundation is seeking one person, who is not in the industry, who is appointed by the current members of the board then in office and who, in the opinion of those members, possesses special skills or experience to assist the board in carrying out the Foundation’s purposes. Preference will be given to a candidate who brings the following skills and experience:

•    Background and experience in land use, urban planning and understanding of housing choices in Alberta, including condominium ownership.
•    Previous non-profit board experience.
•    Previous experience in grantmaking or community investment.
•    Knowledge of the Alberta real estate and land use issues and challenges.
•    Is not a practicing or licensed member of the real estate industry.
•    Resident of Alberta – rural or urban.

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation’s Governors are responsible for policy development, investing in community initiatives, fiduciary matters as well as attending board meetings and representing the Foundation at related events. Three board meetings are held per year; the term of the appointment will commence January 31, 2014. The Foundation is independent of organized real estate and licensing authorities.

For more information, please view the complete description here or contact Executive Director, Cheryl De Paoli, at 403.228.4786 or cdepaoli@aref.ab.ca .

All applications are due by December 11th, 2013.

Fall Funding from the Foundation

The Board of Governors of the Alberta Real Estate Foundation recently approved $159,300 in community investment projects at their recent meeting on September 27, 2013. Bringing our annual total to $622,300 for 21 projects.

Of the 5 projects we funded in September we are happy to include:

$40,000 for the Alberta Real Estate Foundation to fund community and industry sponsorships.

$59,000 to the Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta for their 2015-2016 year of Landlord and Tenants project.

$20,000 to the University of Alberta, School of Retailing for research into condominiums.

$15,000 to Yellowstone to Yukon for their “Protecting our Home: Supporting land use planning in southern Alberta” project.

$25,000 for Water Matters to advance ground water policy in Alberta.

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation supports initiatives that enhance the Real Estate Industry and benefit the communities of Alberta. The Foundation was set up in 1991 under the Alberta Real Estate Act. Since then, it has awarded over 14.3 million dollars in community and industry grants to over 460 projects across Alberta.

After the Flood – A Resource for Landlords and Tenants

The Centre for Public Legal Education just put together this resource for landlords and tenants who have been devastated by the floods in Alberta. You can go to the resource or click here to listen to an audio Q & A version. Thanks to Marc Affeld at CJSW 90.9 FM, Calgary’s Community Radio station, for developing the recording and making it available.

So many people in Alberta have been involved with the floods; please pass this information along to those who need it.

The resource answers common questions, like:

  • What if the rental property has been damaged by a flood?
  • Does the tenant have to keep paying the rent after a flood?
  • Can the tenant move out because of the flood?
  • Can the landlord use the security deposit to pay for damages?
  • Who pays for stuff that is damaged?
  • What if the tenant thinks the property isn’t safe or healthy to live in?
  • Tips to help
  • Where can tenants and landlords get more help?

Alberta Real Estate Association’s Service Excellence Program

Aimed at enhancing the professionalism of Alberta REALTORS®, the Alberta Real Estate Association (AREA)’s Service Excellence Program is a comprehensive professional development opportunity helping to align the services Alberta REALTORS® provide with what today’s consumers expect. Using extensive consumer research, the program provides REALTORS® the knowledge of how those expectations have changed, and then provides the tools to help ensure the REALTOR®’s service meets or exceeds clients’ expectations.

The advent of the Internet has resulted in more online resources becoming available to consumers. This, in turn, has lessened the REALTOR®’s role in finding neighbourhoods and properties that pique a client’s interest. However, the relatively high cost of property and a more complex and litigious contract environment are two reasons why clients value the REALTOR® as guide and advisor more than ever before. The Service Excellence Program is all about this reality and how REALTORS® can effectively adapt their services in order to better serve today’s consumers. 

The program comprises three parts:  first is The Art of Service Excellence, a high-quality, interactive online course packed with tips, tools, downloadable resources and customizable templates. Following completion of the course, REALTOR® can gain access to the second part of the program: The Measure of Service Excellence, an independent third-party client satisfaction survey that correlates with the course material and that REALTORS® can use with their clients. The third part of the program:  The Proof of Service Excellence, still under development, is a provincial certification process that will allow Alberta REALTORS® to become Service Excellence certified.

Click here to watch a video about the program and read testimonials from REALTORS® who’ve completed the online Service Excellence course. Contact AREA with any questions at pd@areahub.ca or by phone at 1.800.661.0231. AREA wishes to thank the Alberta Real Estate Foundation for their generous sponsorship of this initiative.

CRSC releases new issue of Curb Magazine – “Suburban Land Use: Strip Malls and Parking Lots”

By: Brittany Stares, Managing Editor, Curb Magazine

 
Suburban land use poses unique challenges for planners, developers and residents; particularly in those communities that are well-established and have limited space upon which to draw. The sprawl, segregation and dependence on the private automobile that often characterizes the suburbs undermine broader pushes for community-building and sustainability.

The winter issue of Curb Magazine, entitled “Suburban Land Use: Strip Malls and Parking Lots,” explores this topic, with a particular focus on better utilizing space in the suburbs through the re-imagining, retrofitting or redevelopment of existing, outdated sites. Using under-performing strip malls and their associated parking lots as the basis for innovative planning, featured articles highlight the potential – and pathways – for these unloved spaces to reduce sprawl, encourage alternative means of transportation, decrease greenhouse gas emissions and stimulate economic, cultural and recreational activity. Contributors include winning and shortlisted entrants from the international ideas competition, “Strip Appeal: Reinventing the Strip Mall” and renowned architect/author, Ellen Dunham-Jones.

Curb Magazine is published by the City-Region Studies Centre (CRSC) at the University of Alberta, and focuses on policy practice and community experience in cities, regions and rural areas. Curb is distributed to municipal offices and planning departments across Canada and the northwestern United States. The CRSC aims to inform public policy by increasing understanding of cultural, political and economic interactions and inter-dependencies within social spaces. It is one of the only centres in North America focusing on regional as well as municipal research.

Curb 3.2, “Suburban Land Use: Strip Malls and Parking Lots,” is available now through the CRSC website (http://www.crsc.ualberta.ca/). This issue has been generously sponsored by the Alberta Real Estate Foundation, along with our following issue on stewardship and sustainability in planning.

Foundation Announces Spring 2013 Community Investment

The Board of Governors of the Alberta Real Estate Foundation recently approved $295,000 in community investment projects at their recent meeting on March 8, 2013.

We are happy to announce the following 8 community investment projects include:

$20,000 to the Calgary Horticultural Society to enhance capacity of the Community Gardens Resource Network.

$60,000 to the Calgary Chamber of Commerce for policy research as part of their Great Cities Series.

$20,000 to the Friends of Fish Creek to further develop their Community Watershed Stewardship Project.

$75,000    to the Haskayne School of Business to develop a Real Estate and Entrepreneurship Studies Program.
    
$50,000    to the Faculty of Geography of the University of Calgary for the Heat Score initiative to develop a Home Energy Efficiency Dashboard (HEED) in order to Support Green Real Estate.
    
$30,000 to Operation Grasslands Community Program in order to Engage Stakeholders in Alberta’s Grassland Region in Sustainable Land-use Solutions.
    
$25,000 for Sustainable Cities International to Launch their Inaugural Session of the Sustainable Cities International Energy Lab (SCIEL)
    
$15,000 to the Waterton Biosphere Reserve Association for Building Constituency for Conservation and Sustainability in Waterton Biosphere Reserve Area.

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation supports initiatives that enhance the Real Estate Industry and benefit the communities of Alberta. The Foundation was set up in 1991 under the Alberta Real Estate Act. Since then, it has awarded over 14.2 million dollars in community and industry grants to over 455 projects across Alberta.

Co-Gen Melcor YMCA Village

Thanks to funding from the Alberta Real Estate Foundation, the newly constructed Melcor YMCA Village will include Co-gen, a vital energy efficiency component.  Situated in the core of Edmonton’s Boyle Street Community, the Melcor YMCA Village – Affordable Housing Facility will be home to more than 150 low-income families, couples, and individuals, including people with limited mobility.

The Co-gen project will help ease the financial burden that many Melcor tenants face by reducing heating costs through the energy converting technology.  For many low-income individuals, times arise when they need to choose between paying their rent and paying for groceries. These individuals are at times one pay check away from losing their homes.  Co-gen not only has environmental benefits but will help the residents stay housed by keeping their housing affordable. 

On behalf of the YMCA of Edmonton, we would like to thank you for all of your support. 

  

Let’s Talk Condos!

Earlier today we got note that Service Alberta has begun a consultation process to review the Condominium Property Act (CPA). It seems the Government of Alberta is taking steps to strengthen condominium legislation to address the current needs of condominium corporations, unit owners, and developers; and raise standards in Alberta’s condominium industry.

Alberta’s inner city Real Estate is still on an upward rise and so condo issues are becoming important to a vast growing number of Albertans. Read the paper on this topic here. As part of their consultation with Albertans’, Service Alberta has also setup a survey; available online here: http://www.servicealberta.ca/cfml/survey/.

Do take this opportunity to give your feedback and input into the future of Condominium Legislation in Alberta. The deadline for input is April 2nd, 2013.

The Foundation Supports Energy Efficiency in Real Estate

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation is currently supporting an energy efficiency pilot project for commercial buildings and industrial facilities. The project, EE Check, provides assistance to facilities to undertake an energy efficiency audit, develop a business case for upgrades and implement selected upgrades.

The first building to complete an audit was the Petex building in downtown Calgary. The owners, Western Securities, worked with the EE Check team and an independent energy auditor – Mission Green Buildings – to quantify their energy saving opportunities.

The energy audit compared the building’s energy use to both average and high-performing buildings in Alberta (on a m2 basis) and identified 15 opportunities for reducing energy use.

Not all of the opportunities identified meet the client’s needs from an operational or economic perspective, but a number of the opportunities were selected for implementation. One of the most cost effective upgrades involves higher efficiency stairwell lights that are estimated to pay for themselves in less than one year through the energy they save. The energy savings also translate into reduced environmental impacts for the building’s operation.

As Western Securities works to implement the energy saving measures recommended in the audit, the EE Check team will be working to document the energy, cost and emissions savings achieved.

This project is another demonstration of the Alberta Real Estate Foundation’s commitment to increasing the sustainability of Alberta’s real estate industry – both from an economic and environmental perspective.

For more information on the EE Check pilot project, please contact Jesse Row at jesser@pembina.org.

The Foundation Remembers Governor Sherry Belcourt-Darby

On December 18th, 2012 Sherry Belcourt-Darby passed away in Edmonton.

Sherry and the Governors of Alberta Real Estate Foundation at our 20th AnniversarySherry spent over 35 years in the Real Estate industry and was well respected  as an industry leader,  and for her dedication and professionalism.  She believed in further education and she was an instructor for  the Canadian Real Estate Association, the Alberta Real Estate Association  and the REALTORS® Association of Edmonton. Sherry served as RAE President in 1997,  was President of Edmonton Realtor Charitable Foundation in 2000, and AREA President in 2006.

Sherry was a life member in both AREA and RAE and was RAE REALTOR® of the Year in 2002. Sherry was a tireless volunteer and served as a Governor on the Alberta Real Estate Foundation until earlier this year when her health failed her. Sherry was Broker and co-owner of Coldwell Banker Panda Realty with her husband Tom.

Sherry had her degree in Music and Education and taught in the public school system before her career in real estate.   Her memory will be held dear by her husband, Tom Darby, daughters Gigi Belcourt, Sandra Veer (Jeff) Sheri Darby (Jason Rastovski)  sister Judy Chapman (Ken) Nephew Jake Chapman. Baba will be lovingly remembered by her grandchildren Kristen and Alex Veer and Paige Rastovski and by her many friends, industry colleagues and especially her staff at Panda Realty.  

Donations in memory of Sherry may be made to the REALTORS® Community Foundation 14220 – 112 Avenue, Edmonton, T5M 2T8 780-452-1135 The REALTORS® Community Foundation supports projects involving, shelter, homelessness, hunger, crime prevention and special projects.

Century Homes Calgary receives the Governor General’s History Award

Centure Homes CalgaryDecember 4th Calgary – Century Homes Calgary receives the Governor General’s History Award for Excellence in Community Programming

The Governor General’s History Award for Excellence in Community Programming was created by Canada’s History Society (http://www.canadashistory.ca/) to recognize programming developed by volunteer-led heritage, community and cultural organisations at the
grassroots level, the award judges considered a variety of criteria when evaluating the submissions, including audience reach, historical research and innovation. According to Joanna Dawson, community engagement coordinator of Canada’s History Society, Century Homes Calgary stood out because of its significant impact on the community, both in terms of the number of participants in the project, and the number of those benefitting from the legacy of the research in future years.

As you may be aware, 508 historic homes in 30 communities participated in Century Homes Calgary. The project focused on homes constructed during Calgary’s first building boom, which peaked in 1912, with people celebrating their home’s 100th birthday in a citywide event.

The projects intention was to increase awareness and appreciation of Calgary’s heritage homes by engaging the people who live in them. The number of people who signed up to do research and display their passion for their Century Homes with signs and banners was overwhelming.

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation is proud to have supported this project in its first year.

Executive Director Cheryl De Paoli commends the award by saying “Century Homes Calgary is an innovative project that got communities and the public engaged with the history of homes and neighbourhoods in Calgary. A well deserved recognition indeed.

Plans are underway for a 2013 round of Century Homes in Calgary.

The Foundation Welcomes Charlie Ponde to our Board of Governors

In October of this year the Foundation welcomed its newest member to the board, Charlie Ponde. Charlie comes to us from the Alberta Real Estate Association and will stay on as a Governor for 3 years. 

Charlie Ponde was born in India and completed his university education in the city of Mumbai.
Charlie immigrated to Canada 43 years ago. After working in the dental field, Charlie entered the
real estate profession in 1992, to fulfill a passion for buying and selling real estate and for
working with people. Charlie has been an active and full-time member of the REALTORS®
Association of Edmonton ever since. Charlie was first elected as a Director in 2003 and again in
2006.

Charlie was elected and served as the President of The Realtors® Association Of Edmonton in
2009 and now is a Life Member of the association. He served on numerous committees relating
to real estate including AREX Claims Committee, the Edmonton Realtors’ Charitable Foundation
(Governor and President), the Arbitration and Professional Standards Committee, the
Technology Committee and the Government and Political Action Committee.

An active member of the community, Charlie was involved with the: Affordable Housing
Committee, Sign of Hope Campaign – Catholic Social Services, The Christmas Bureau, Realty
Watch and the Neighborhood Watch Programs, St. Albert Lottery Board, St. Albert’s City Plan
2000 Advisory Committee (Municipal Development Plan) and the Edmonton Immigrant Services
Association.

Charlie is married to his wife Brenda for 30 years, has two married daughters and is very proud
of his grandchildren. Charlie loves travelling, golf, fitness, Yoga, and spending quality time with
his family and friends.

Did you miss the AREF event with Todd Hirsch? Opportunity to view the presentation.

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation featured Todd Hirsch, Senior Economist at ATB Financial and co-author of The Boiling Frog Dilemma, as part of their Thought Leader Series. Over two hundred Real Estate professionals and representatives attended this event in Calgary and Edmonton. So far, the feedback from attendees has been excellent – mostly due to the unique nature of information presented.

At the crux of his presentation Hirsch argues that Canada’s economy has done reasonably well, yet things are not all they seem. Like a frog in a pot of warm water, Canadians have not yet realized the changes an increasingly global economy can bring. That takes creative thinking. Hirsch says, “In Real Estate, it’s all about asking yourself, “How can I become more creative in what I’m doing, how can I offer more innovative services to my clients?” He encouraged REALTORS® to break free of old frameworks and present themselves in a different way from what others are doing through invention and reinvention.

Here’s what attendees had to say about the presentation:
 

 “Always good to get economic news from a practicing economist. Good speaker
and very knowledgeable on the local, provincial, Canadian and global markets.
Easy to listen to as well. Good job!”   
“Todd was very convincing in outlining the inter connectivity between Canada and
the world and how vulnerable we are in spite of all our resources: I liked his idea
that we have to move beyond “value added” , instead create and innovate and
sell that to the world.”  
 “Appreciated the overall global outlook in relationship to Alberta’s economy.
Great presentation! Thanks!”  

If you want to watch this presentation for yourself, view our Tedx-style talk below. As always, we would appreciate your feedback. Did you like the presentation? Was is helpful to you as a REALTOR®? Please leave your comments.

Foundation Announces Fall 2012 Community Investment Recipients

The Board of Governors of the Alberta Real Estate Foundation recently approved $103,225 in community investment projects at their recent meeting on Oct 19th, 2012.

Notable projects include:

$10,000 to the University of Alberta, School of Business (ualberta.ca) to enhance undergraduate student opportunities in the field of Real Estate education. 

$35,000 to Alberta Real Estate Foundation (aref.ab.ca) for Industry and Community Sponsorships

$58,225 to the Centre for Public Legal Education (cplea.ca) for the Residential Tenancies Legal Information extension for 2014-2015.

Executive Director De Paoli remarked “even though interest rates remain low, the Alberta Real Estate Foundation continues to support community and industry projects throughout the Province. We look forward to continuing to support groups in 2013”

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation supports initiatives that enhance the Real Estate Industry and benefit the communities of Alberta. The Foundation was set up in 1991 under the Alberta Real Estate Act. Since then, it has awarded over 14.2 million dollars in community and industry grants to over 455 projects across Alberta.

Todd Hirsch Speaking in Calgary and Edmonton

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation brings you Alberta’s top economist to talk about the future of the Real Estate Industry in Alberta amidst a fast changing globalized world. 

Canada’s economy has done reasonably well, yet things are not all that they seem. Like a frog in a pot of warm water, Canadians have not yet realized the changes an increasingly global economy can bring. How will this impact the real estate industry based on current patterns, trends and forecasts? Will Alberta’s real estate industry be shielded? 
 
This is an event you won’t want to miss!


Todd Hirsch is a Senior Economist at ATB Financial and Co-author of the Boiling Frog Dilemma

 
Registration is free and seats are limited, so reserve your spot today!
 

Calgary
: October 25, 2012 at the Calgary Real Estate Board, 300 Manning Rd NE
Register your spot online here: http://thoughtleadersyyc2012.eventbrite.com


Edmonton:
November 6, 2012 at the Citadel Theatre, 9828 101A Avenue
Register your spot online here: http://thoughtleadersyeg2012.eventbrite.com

Both sessions will take place from 11:30-1:30 p.m. A light lunch will be provided.

Foundation introduces Governor Christine Zwozdesky

The Alberta Real Estate Foundation (AREF) is pleased to announce that Christine Zwozdesky has joined our Board of Governors for a three-year term. She brings a wealth of experience in the real estate industry and community and is looking forward to bringing her considerable knowledge in governance, strategic planning, and financial management to the board.

Christine was a licensed real estate professional for 18 years. She enjoyed a lengthy career in property management with regional and national companies until she started her own commercial real estate consulting firm in 2007.

A former President of both the Building Owners and Managers Association (BOMA) Edmonton chapter and Edmonton’s Commercial Real Estate Women (CREW) chapter, Christine also sat on the Real Estate Council of Alberta for two terms, including serving as Chair of Council, and she was a Director with the Capital Region Housing Corporation for 9 years.

She is currently a Director on the Capital Region Housing Foundation, is on the National Board of the Ukrainian Self-Reliance League of Canada, and is an active volunteer with a number of not-for-profit organizations.

Christine is a native Edmontonian and received her Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Alberta. Recently she achieved her ICD designation from the Institute of Corporate Directors and her Certification in Tribunal Administrative Justice (CTAJ).

Christine is pleased to work with AREF in its efforts to support of the real estate industry and the community at large. “I believe the real estate industry was facing significant and material challenges even before the onset of our new pandemic realities,” she said. “As a result, investment by AREF in community projects is more important than ever.  I am honoured to lend my education, experience, and enthusiasm to identifying the needs, analyzing the initiatives, and supporting progress to strengthen our industry and economy.”

Christine indulges her creative side with projects in millinery and fashion design and upcycling.  She enjoys singing with the St. John’s Cathedral choir and with the John Cameron Changing Lives Foundation choir, but her greatest joy comes from spending time with her family and four grandchildren.

Christine is one of the three Public Appointments sitting on the Board of Governors.