WellWiki Alberta
By: University of Alberta – Alberta School of Business
Grant Number: 2017-15

WellWiki.org is a groundbreaking solution to the problem of information access and transparency related to data on oil and gas development. While in many cases some data on wells is publicly available, interested parties face an arcane and obscure process for accessing it which deters many from pursing the information they need. WellWiki.org solves this problem, providing access to information in an easy to use format available to all and has been successful across North America.

In ,
Alberta Narratives Project
By: Pembina Institute
Grant Number: 2018-02

The Alberta Narratives Project Report I and Report II are intended to provide practical guidance for climate and energy communicators about what language works well and – crucially – what language might pose an obstacle for communicating with any specific group.

Report I, Communicating Climate Change and Energy in Alberta is concerned with finding the language that works best across Albertan society by helping to find common ground across very different positions. This generates a core narrative that can be applied for general public engagement.

Report II, Communicating Climate Change and Energy with Different Audiences in Alberta offers tailored language that can be the basis of effective communications with each of the following groups: oil sands workers, conservatives, environmentalists, rural Albertans, business leaders, youth, new Canadians and people of faith.

These are guidebooks, not rulebooks. Skilled communications should always listen to their audiences, and experiment with new and fresh ways of speaking.

In , , , ,
Advancements in Irrigation Agriculture with Implications for Economic Development and Environmental Stewardship in Southern Alberta
By: University of Lethbridge
Grant Number: 2018-05

The final report of a study investigating the adoption of technological advancements in irrigation agriculture found irrigators are actively adopting these technologies, generating benefits for irrigators, the broader communities that depend on irrigation, and the environment. Often referred to as “precision agriculture”, the technologies improve crop yield and quality, as well as reduce farm inputs. Examples of such technologies are GPS systems, satellite imagery, auto-steer technology, and weather monitoring sensors.

The study, entitled “Advancements in Irrigation Agriculture with Implications for Economic and Community Development and Environmental Stewardship in Southern Alberta”, surveyed Taber Irrigation District irrigators. The findings were recently released by researchers Drs. Lorraine and Chris Nicol of the University of Lethbridge.

The study found:
– 81% of irrigators have adopted some form of precision agriculture;
– yearly crop yields have increased an average 20% and yearly crop quality has increased an average 16%;
– yearly reductions in irrigation water, fertilizer, herbicides and pesticides have ranged from 14% to 24%;
– precision agriculture technologies are being applied largely to specialty crops;
– for 85% of adopters, precision agriculture has affected their overall farm management approach;
– 89% of adopters are highly satisfied with the technology;
– 92% of adopters plan to adopt additional precision agriculture technologies in the future;
– non-adopters indicate small operations, high investment costs, and incompatibility of machines are the main reasons for their non-adoption of precision agriculture technologies.

In , , ,
Nexus Water Brochure
By: Alberta Water Portal Society
Grant Number: 2016-20

Founded in 2006, in the spirit of the Water for Life strategy, the Alberta WaterPortal provides inclusive research, community engagement, and educational activities to improve the public’s understanding of the importance of water in Alberta, as well as providing Albertans with the knowledge needed to make better water management decisions.

Today’s water challenges and opportunities clearly cross many different jurisdictions, stakeholders and communities. Addressing the protection, allocation and management of our water resources and water systems requires creative mechanisms for dialogue and networking, as well as coordinated efforts to explore and share data and experiences among water users, managers, and researchers.

In , , ,
Residential Rebates for Alberta’s Homeowners
By: Alberta Real Estate Association
Grant Number: 2017-07
In , , ,
Tenant Education Project
By: Camrose Open Door Association
Grant Number: 2016-24
In , ,
Laws for Landlords and Tenants in Alberta
By: Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta
Grant Number: 2018-11
In , , ,
Canadian Rental Housing Index
By: BC Non-Profit Housing Association
Grant Number: 2017-21

The Index is a comprehensive database that compiles rental housing statistics for cities, regions, and provinces across Canada. See how much rent Canadians are paying in different parts of the country, compare affordability measures and find out where residents are overcrowded and severely overspending on housing.

In ,
The Alberta Water Nexus: Energy, Food, People
By: Alberta WaterPortal Society
Grant Number: 2016-20

Water is the nexus between food, energy, and people. Water is required to meet the demands of our growing population, to maintain and improve environmental health, and to support the production of food and energy. As the availability of water changes and our population grows meeting the demands in the Nexus will become increasingly challenging.

In , ,
Renting Basics – Easy Read Guide to Renting in ALberta
By: Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta
Grant Number: 2014-16

This resource allows CPLEA to continue to help Albertans understand housing law by providing easy to understand legal information through the website, resources and workshops. Its services are timely, practical and available across the province, which means CPLEA can provide help to rural people and to vulnerable audiences who do not have other housing or legal help available to them.

In , , ,