Tenant Education Project
By: Camrose Open Door Association
Grant Number: 2016-24
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Laws for Landlords and Tenants in Alberta
By: Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta
Grant Number: 2018-11
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Canadian Rental Housing Index
By: BC Non-Profit Housing Association
Grant Number: 2017-21

The Index is a comprehensive database that compiles rental housing statistics for cities, regions, and provinces across Canada. See how much rent Canadians are paying in different parts of the country, compare affordability measures and find out where residents are overcrowded and severely overspending on housing.

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The Alberta Water Nexus: Energy, Food, People
By: Alberta WaterPortal Society
Grant Number: 2016-20

Water is the nexus between food, energy, and people. Water is required to meet the demands of our growing population, to maintain and improve environmental health, and to support the production of food and energy. As the availability of water changes and our population grows meeting the demands in the Nexus will become increasingly challenging.

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Renting Basics – Easy Read Guide to Renting in ALberta
By: Centre for Public Legal Education Alberta
Grant Number: 2014-16

This resource allows CPLEA to continue to help Albertans understand housing law by providing easy to understand legal information through the website, resources and workshops. Its services are timely, practical and available across the province, which means CPLEA can provide help to rural people and to vulnerable audiences who do not have other housing or legal help available to them.

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Conservation Easements for Landowners
By: Legacy Land Trust Society
Grant Number: 2017-04

A conservation easement is a voluntary agreement between a landowner and a qualified organization (such as the Legacy Land Trust Society) which limits the amount and type of development that can occur on a property in order to preserve its natural character and agricultural potential.

When a landowner takes on a conservation easement there are associated financial benefits that can help landowners pass their property on to heirs or to new owners as a viable agricultural unit or a natural landscape.

Although conservation easements have been used in Alberta since 1996, many people are still unfamiliar with them. They are a flexible tool that help to meet landowner and land trust needs, but can also be quite complex. This booklet is not a replacement for the expert advice you need related to your individual situation – talk to your lawyer, your tax advisor, and your estate planner about what a conservation easement can mean for you.

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