Conservation Easements for Landowners
By: Legacy Land Trust Society
Grant Number: 2017-04

A conservation easement is a voluntary agreement between a landowner and a qualified organization (such as the Legacy Land Trust Society) which limits the amount and type of development that can occur on a property in order to preserve its natural character and agricultural potential.

When a landowner takes on a conservation easement there are associated financial benefits that can help landowners pass their property on to heirs or to new owners as a viable agricultural unit or a natural landscape.

Although conservation easements have been used in Alberta since 1996, many people are still unfamiliar with them. They are a flexible tool that help to meet landowner and land trust needs, but can also be quite complex. This booklet is not a replacement for the expert advice you need related to your individual situation – talk to your lawyer, your tax advisor, and your estate planner about what a conservation easement can mean for you.

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Green Acreages Guide Primer
By: Land Stewardship Centre
Grant Number: 2016-14

As a landowner you want to do the right thing for your property. The Green Acreages Guide Primer, an introduction to rural living, can help you better understand what it means to be a rural property owner and identify stewardship practices that will help you conserve and protect the valuable natural assets associated with your property.

New content! The Green Acreages Guide Primer has been updated with new and updated links in “Further Resources” as well as new information for acreages owners on “Resource Development and Extraction” and “Easements and Rights-of-Way”.

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Landowners’ Guide to Oil and Gas Development
By: Pembina Institute
Grant Number: 2015-04

Alberta’s energy development landscape is a maze of regulations and complex relationships. The Landowners’ Guide to Oil and Gas Development provides advice on negotiating the best relationship possible between industry representatives who live and breathe this subject matter and property owners or communities that may be facing it for the first time. It also provides accessible advice on some of these complex questions:

  • If a permit agent knocks at your door and says a company wants to conduct seismic exploration on your land, how do you decide whether to grant permission?
  • If a land agent tells you a company plans to drill a well or put a pipeline on your land, what do you need to know before you start negotiations? How do you decide whether any special conditions are needed in a surface lease or right-of-entry agreement?
  • If there are plans to build a well or pipeline near your home, is the company obliged to tell you or consult with you?
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