Ducks Unlimited Canada

Marketing Opportunities in Conservation Incentives Seminar

How can land that is or could be part of a conservation program advantage your realty business? That’s what you’ll find out with this new one-day course developed by Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC) and supported by the Alberta Real Estate Foundation (AREF). After completing the course, you’ll discover that the benefits of restoration and conservation programs go beyond environmental; they can actually bring you more revenue potential. The key for you is being able to scout the opportunities.

This course explains how DUC identifies and secures properties with high restoration and conservation value potential. As a realtor, you can play an important part in this process as you are well positioned to help identify land that may qualify for DUC programs. This could also lead to gains for your business down the road from the potential sale and resale of the land.

Course topics include:
• What is a wetland and why wetlands matter
• Identifying existing wetlands and wetland restoration opportunities
• Historic loss of wetlands and the resulting impact on water quality,  flooding, drought and biodiversity
• Societal attitudes regarding wetlands and how they are changing
• Wetland and upland restoration and conservation incentive  programs offered by DUC including the Revolving Land Conservation  Purchase program, Wetland Restoration Lease program, and  conservation easements, and how they can enhance your business
• Geographic areas that offer the most potential for conservation and wetland restoration programs

Wednesday, September 27
Olds College – Continuing Education
4500 – 50 Street
Olds, Alberta T4H 1R6
To register, email coned@oldscollege.ca or phone 403 556 4740
Thursday, October 12
Lakeland College – Room AL207
5707 College Drive
Vermilion, Alberta T9X 1K5
To register, email marilyn.sommer@lakelandcollege.ca or phone 780 853 8457

Alberta Emerald Foundation

The Emerald Awards are uniquely Canadian and allow Albertans to be recognized and celebrated for their outstanding environmental achievements in over 12 categories annually. Since 1992 the Emerald Awards have recognized nearly 300 recipients for their innovative and thoughtful projects, resulting in a healthier and cleaner environment for us all. The Shared Footprints Award is one of 12 categories that allow groups to showcase projects that create environmentally ethical plans aimed at managing the impact of human use of land and resources. It is a form of stewardship that changes the way we do business, ensuring that we share the land and work together to reduce the impact on that land.

 

Land Stewardship Centre of Canada

This project will see the update and re-print of a wildly successful education and awareness tool, The Green Acreages Guide Primer. The Primer will be updated with content which was identified by partners as a necessary instalment to fulfilling landowners’ educational needs. By project end, realtors, stewards and Albertans everywhere will again have access to a key resource to assist them in sustainably managing their property for the benefit of the environment.

Alberta Energy Efficiency Alliance

To date, the Alberta Energy Efficiency Alliance (AEEA) has made significant progress in motivating the creation of new energy efficiency programs for Alberta. These programs will lead to about $300 million of program funding over the next three years, but investments past that time are still uncertain. With this project, the AEEA proposes to work with government and stakeholders to help ensure Alberta’s new EE programs continue beyond a three year horizon and grow over time.

Alternative Land Use Services (ALUS)

The AAMA is made up of ten ALUS communities, led by ALUS in partnership with municipalities. These programs are changing private land and conservation dynamics in several ways: they incentivize conservation activities on agricultural land by paying for ecosystem services; they build ownership over conservation and community support (each community forms a Partnership Advisory Committee made up of farmers, municipal officials, realtors, watershed based conservation groups, etc.); and they achieve measurable, verified conservation.

 

Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative

Upstream, Downstream: Safeguarding Albertan headwaters, homes and wildlife habitat”, will promote responsible land-use by engaging Albertans in the 2015 North Saskatchewan Regional planning process. Recent floods clearly demonstrated that Alberta’s headwaters, which provide fresh water, diverse recreation opportunities, key wildlife habitat and important ecological services, need more careful protection.