The School of Public Policy, University of Calgary

The School of Public Policy’s newly established Urban Program engages in research and outreach activities (conferences, roundtables, and media events) on the public policy issues that affect mid-sized cities (500,000 to 2 million) in Canada.

Our analysis of the policy issues concerning urban growth, land use, infrastructure, taxation, and environmental quality, amongst others, will increase public dialogue around real estate practices, housing markets, and the fiscal and regulatory policies of urban governments.

The School of Public Policy is uniquely positioned to focus and coordinate the expertise of academics and those with practical experience in the field of urban develop and policy formulation to fill significant gaps in our understanding of urban policy issues in medium-sized cities.

Center for Public Legal Education

The funding extension would allow us to continue to help Albertans understand housing law by providing easy to understand legal information through the website, resources and workshops. Our services are timely, practical and available across the province, which means we provide help to rural people and to vulnerable audiences who do not have other housing or legal help available to them.

Land Stewardship Centre of Canada

The average person puts 340 litres of sewage through a private sewage system (septic system) every day. For a family of four living in a two-bedroom house, that amounts to 1,360 litres per day and just under half a million litres per year. The last Alberta census shows that rural residential landowners represent 14% of Alberta’s population. The decisions of those acreage owners about how to manage and maintain their septic systems have the potential to have a significant cumulative effect on the Alberta landscape.

Edmonton Social Planning Council

To develop and disseminate neighborhood profiles which will be available to community groups, city departments, civic promoters, property developers, residents and home buyers. These narratives provide basic demographic information about specific about specific neighborhoods but also capture and describe “stories” that reflect the deeper community background of each neighborhood.